Updated July 24, 2014

Two months before the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Massacre, authorities in China began detaining, disappearing, questioning, and intimidating Chinese dissidents, human rights lawyers and activists, journalists, and others. Many of the targeted individuals took part in the pro-democracy demonstrations in the spring of 1989. The crackdown is meant to preemptively silence any public expression about the bloody suppression of the pro-democracy protests, and to prevent any show of support to victims and their families who have struggled for a quarter-century to tell the truth about Tiananmen and fight for justice.

CHRD has documented 152 individuals who have been affected, beginning at the end of April 2014, in Beijing, Chongqing, Guangdong, Guizhou, Hebei, Henan, Hunan, Jiangsu, Shaanxi, Shanghai, Shandong, Sichuan, Xinjiang, Yunnan, and Zhejiang, with 44 criminal detentions (15 are still detained) and 20 confirmed arrests. Additionally, 15 activists have received administrative detentions, and four are still out of contact. Twenty-nine have been released, with many facing strict police restrictions attached to “bail pending further investigation” conditions.

Some in custody have reportedly been mistreated. They have been deprived of necessary medications for serious illnesses or visits from their lawyers, or have faced physical assault or verbal intimidation.

CHRD urges the Chinese authorities to release all individuals who have been detained in the run-up to the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Massacre, and to guarantee the physical and psychological wellbeing of detainees.

22 July 6.4 crackdown map image

Cases documented by CHRD since late April 2014, categorized by types of detention, and in reverse chronological order:

Arrest

Five activists were arrested for “creating a disturbance” after taking part in a June 4th public memorial service in Hua County, Henan Province on February 2. The service commemorated the victims of the massacre, as well as former Chinese leaders Hu Yaobang (胡耀邦), whose death in 1989 was a trigger for the student protests, and Zhao Ziyang (赵紫阳), who was deposed for supporting the students. Two of their lawyers were also arrested on the same charges, while two activists were released on “bail pending further investigation.” All seven detainees are being held at the Zhengzhou No. 3 Detention Center.

Several activists who took part in this Tiananmen Massace memorial service in February were criminally detained in May

Several activists who took part in this February 2 Tiananmen Massace memorial service in Henan were criminally detained in May

MR CHANG BOYANG (常伯阳), a well-known rights defense lawyer, was arrested on July 3 on suspicion of “illegal business activity.” He had been summoned for questioning on May 27 and afterwards was criminally detained on charges of “gathering a crowd to disrupt order of a public place.” Chang was questioned at Erligang police station in Zhengzhou City, and then detained in Zhengzhou No. 3 Detention Center. He is the attorney of Shi Yu, Hou Shuai, and Fang Yan, who were taken away by police on May 26 (see below).

MR JI LAISONG (姬来松), a Zhengzhou, Henan lawyer Ji Laisong, was arrested on July 2 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” He had been criminally detained on charges of “gathering a crowd to disrupt order of a public place” after going missing on May 26. Ji is being held at Zhengzhou No. 3 Detention Center after being moved from Xingyang City PSB No. 3 Detention Center.

陈卫和于世文MS CHEN WEI (陈卫), the organizer of the service with her husband Yu Shiwen (于世文), was arrested on July 2 on charges of “creating a disturbance.” She had been taken away by police on May 26, along with Yu, and was criminally detained for “gathering a crowd to disrupt order of a public place” on May 27. Chen is being held at the Zhengzhou No. 3 Detention Center. She and her husband had been held under house arrest from February until they were taken into custody. They were both student leaders during the 1989 student protests, and got married after they both served 18-month prison sentences.

MR YU SHIWEN (于世文), the organizer of the service with his wife Chen Wei (陈卫), was arrested on July 2 on charges of “creating a disturbance.” He was taken away by police on May 26, along with Chen, and was criminally detained for “gathering a crowd to disrupt order of a public place” on May 27. Yu is being held at the Zhengzhou No. 3 Detention Center. He and his wife had been held under house arrest from February until they were taken into custody. They were both student leaders during the 1989 student protests, and got married after they both served 18-month prison sentences.

HOU SHUAI (侯帅), was arrested on July 2 on charges of “creating a disturbance.” Hou had been taken away by Henan police on May 26, and put under criminal detention the next day for “gathering a crowd to disrupt order of a public place.” Hou is being held at the No. 3 Detention Center of the Zhengzhou City Public Security Bureau Prison Administration Department. Hou is an environmental activist and previously ran as an independent candidate for local elections.

MS FANG YAN (方言, real name Fang Hongwei 方鸿维), a Zhengzhou netizen activist, Fang was arrested on July 2 on charges of “creating a disturbance.” She had been taken away by Henan police on May 26, and criminally detained on May 27 on charges of “gathering a crowd to disrupt order of a public place.” Her family received a criminal detention notice on May 29. She is being held at Zhengzhou No. 3 Detention Center of the Zhengzhou City Public Security Bureau Prison Administration Department.

MR DONG GUANGPING (董广平), from Zhengzhou, Henan, was arrested on July 2 on charges of “creating a disturbance.” He had been picked up by police in Luoyang City on May 26. His home in Zhengzhou was later searched, and he was criminally detained on May 27 on charges of “gathering a crowd to disrupt order of a public place.” Dong is being held in Zhengzhou No. 3 Detention Center. He previously spent three years in prison on the charge of “inciting subversion of state power” from 2001-2004.

MR JIANG LIJUN (姜力均), a democracy activist and freelance writer, Jiang was arrested by Liaoning Police on June 25 on charges of “creating a disturbance” and “inciting subversion of state power,” allegedly for information that he circulated online. Shenyang police initially took Jiang away from his home on May 16, though on sole charge of “creating a disturbance,” and criminally detained him two days later. Jiang is being held at Shenyang City No. 1 Detention Center. Jiang was previously sentenced to four years of imprisonment for “inciting subversion of state power” after Yahoo! provided details of his account to Chinese authorities, who then used pro-democracy writings found in his email as evidence in his trial in 2003.

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MR SUN HAIYANG (孙海样), a Shenyang-based journalist for the overseas website Boxun (博讯), has been arrested on the charge of “creating a disturbance”. He was picked up by police on May 16 with Jiang Lijun (姜力均) (above), who has also been arrested, and Ning Xianhua (宁先华), who has been released on “bail pending further investigation.” Sun, born 1982, had previously spent 21 months in RTL from 2009-2010.

 

ShengGuan圣观MR SHENG GUAN (, real name Xu Zhiqiang 徐志强), was arrested on June 25 on charges of “inciting subversion of state power” for giving a lecture on Buddhist teachings. He was taken into custody on May 17, and criminally detained. He has been blocked from meeting his lawyer and is being held at Jiang’an District Detention Center in Wuhan. Sheng, who became a monk in 2001, has been closely monitored by police since 2006, when his temple in Jiangxi Province was used for detaining individuals, leading him to call for the “salvation” of victims of the Tiananmen Massacre and public disclosure of the temple’s assets. In 2009, he was dismissed as a temple abbot in Hunan Province for paying tribute to Hu Yaobang, the high-ranking Chinese official whose death in April of 1989 became a trigger for thousands of students to rally in Tiananmen Square. Sheng Guan was in Xi’an during the student protests of 1989 and was jailed for a year because of his participation.

MS HUANG JINGYI (黄静怡, real name Huang Fangmei 黄芳梅), was arrested on charges of “inciting subversion of state power” on June 25. She was taken into custody on May 17, and was criminally detained. Huang is being held in Jiang’an District Detention Center and has been blocked from meeting her lawyer. She was listening to a lecture by Buddhist monk Sheng Guan when Wuhan police seized her and several others. A former pharmaceutical worker in Wuhan, she was a follower of Buddhism and promoted citizen and social welfare movements.

MR TANG JINGLING (唐荆陵), a 43-year old lawyer, was arrested on June 20 on charges of “inciting subversion of state power, over a month after he was criminally detained in Guangzhou on May 16 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” He is being held at Guangzhou No. 1 Detention Center. Earlier in the morning of May 16, police presented Tang with both a search warrant and a criminal detention notice at his home and then searched the residence. Police confiscated a laptop, a tablet computer, three phones, and books. Reportedly, police had warned Tang not to take part in any activities commemorating June Fourth. On May 21, lawyer Liu Zhengqing (刘正清) met with Tang at Baiyun District Detention Center. Tang told Liu that a discipline management officer had tried to force him to squat but he refused, prompting the enraged officer to violently kick Tang. Tang’s lawyer and wife were blocked from meeting him on June 4, but have learnt he has become thin from the conditions of the detention facility. Tang told his lawyer that the primary reason for his recent detention is due to the civil disobedience movement he has promoted, which included the campaign for “June 4th Meditation.” In recent years, police have detained, threatened, and tortured lawyer Tang in retaliation for his defending a wide range of human rights cases, and authorities have revoked his license to practice law.

MR WANG QINGYING (王清), a 32-year old activist, was arrested on June 20 on suspicion of “inciting subversion of state power,” over a month after he was taken away from his home and criminally detained on charges of “creating a disturbance” on May 16. National security police from the Guangzhou Public Security Bureau also searched his home and confiscated laptops and phones. Wang is now being held in Guangzhou No. 1 Detention Center, after initially being held at Baiyun District Detention Center where he was tortured and mistreated. His lawyer Sui Muqing (隋牧青) visited him on May 23, and learnt that Wang was repeatedly slapped in the face by authorities for refusing to falsify evidence against Tang Jingling and Yuan Xinting. He also had been forced to work long hours and held in a 20-square meter room with 30 other inmates, and given very poor-quality and inadequate food. His lawyer reported after a visit on June 10 that Wang had been interrogated at least 20 times, sometimes for as long as 12-13 hours at a time, until Wang confessed. Since his forced confession, Wang’s treatment has reportedly improved and he can use the toilet, has been placed in a larger room, and is no longer beaten. Wang’s wife Zeng Jieshan (曾洁珊) has also been harassed and threatened by national security officers. Wang is a close associate of lawyer Tang Jingling in what is known as the “Non-violent Citizens’ Disobedience Movement,” spearheaded by Tang. Wang previously taught economics at Huali College of Guangdong Industrial University. After signing Charter 08, the manifesto promoting political reform and democratization in China, he lost his teaching job in 2009.

MR YUAN XINTING (袁新亭), a Guangdong-based activist in his 40s, was arrested on June 20 on charges of “inciting subversion of state power” and is being held at Guangzhou No. 1 Detention Center. He was initially criminally detained on charges of “creating a disturbance” on May 16.  According to Yuan’s girlfriend, Yuan suffers from hypertension (high blood pressure) that requires daily medication, and hemmorrhoids, which have flared up and resulted in bloody excrement. Yuan is a close associate of lawyer Tang Jingling in what is known as the “Non-violent Citizens’ Disobedience Movement,” spearheaded by Tang. Originally from Sichuan Province, Yuan was disappeared during the “Jasmine Crackdown” in March 2011, and then released from police custody and sent back to Sichuan four months later. He had returned to Guangdong and resumed his activism.

MR PU ZHIQIANG (浦志强), a human rights lawyer, was arrested on June 13 on charges of “creating a disturbance” and “illegally obtaining personal information,” just as the legal limit for holding him under criminal detention was set to expire. Pu was criminally detained on charges of “creating a disturbance” on May 6 after taking part in a June Fourth seminar three days earlier. He is currently held at Beijing No. 1 Detention Center. Pu has told his attorneys that he is not receiving proper treatment for illnesses, particularly diabetes, for which he needs daily medication. Due to his physical condition, Pu also requested lawyers Zhang Sizhi (张思之) and Qu Zhenhong (屈振红) have twice sought his release on medical grounds, with the authorities rejecting the second application on June 9 on the grounds that his release would pose a “danger to society.” Pu was first taken away by police on May 5, after they searched his home and confiscated his computer, phone, books, and other personal belongings around 4 PM. The raid of his home followed his being summoned by police around 11 PM on May 4. Police questioned him until 2 AM the next morning, when officers took him home for a change of clothes and then brought him back to a police station around 4 AM to continue the interrogation. Pu Zhiqiang, a Tiananmen student leader in 1989, has defended Re-education through Labor detainees, writers, and journalists in several high-profile cases and been an outspoken critic of official policies.

MS QU ZHENHONG (屈振红), the niece of detained lawyer Pu Zhiqiang (浦志强), was arrested on June 13 on charges of “illegally obtaining person information.” The reason for Qu’s detention has not been confirmed, but some activists speculate that she was seized for “illegally obtaining personal information” about Zhou Bin (周滨), the son of the former national security chief Zhou Yongkang (周永康). Qu was criminally detained on May 15 in Beijing. She is a practicing lawyer who has worked in the same firm as her uncle and served on Pu’s defense team.

贾灵敏老师

MS JIA LINGMIN (贾灵敏), from Zhengzhou, Henan, was formally arrested on charges of “creating a disturbance” on May 30. She is being held in Zhengzhou No. 3 Detention Center. Jia was initially picked up on May 7 and criminally detained the next day for “gathering a crowd to disrupt social order” at Wutong Street Police Station. Her detention allegedly stems from her repeated attempts to request help from police officers for people facing forced demolitions in Gaoxin District. Jia Lingmin is a rights activist who helps victims of forced evictions after suffering from a forced eviction herself.

 

MR LIU DIWEI (), from Zhengzhou, Henan, was arrested on the charge of “creating a disturbance” on May 30. He was first seized on seized on May 7 and criminally detained the next day on suspicion of “gathering a crowd to disrupt social order,” which was later changed. He is being held at Xingyang Detention Center in Zhengzhou. His detention is related to his work with Jia Lingmin (贾灵敏), who was also arrested on May 30.

MS GAO YU (高瑜), a Beijing-based dissident journalist, was arrested on May 30 on charges of “illegally disseminating state secrets overseas.” Her arrest comes after she was criminally detained on April 24, according to official Xinhua news, which also released video footage showing Gao’s “confession” of “wrongdoing” on May 8 (see story). She is being held at Beijing No. 1 Detention Center, and her family were given no notice of her arrest. Her lawyer was only allowed to meet her on June 27. Reportedly, the charges against Gao stem from a “top secret document” linked to her that had been posted to an overseas website in August 2013 and then disseminated more widely. Gao, 70, went missing in late April, when she was preparing to submit a piece titled “Party Nature vs. Human Nature” to the Deutsche Welle, an international broadcaster financed by the German government. In reprisal for backing the pro-democracy movement a quarter-century ago, Gao Yu was barred from publishing within China and also imprisoned for six years on charges of “leaking state secrets.”

MR XU GUANG (徐光), a China Democracy Party member, was formally arrested in Zhejiang Province on May 9 after allegedly planning a hunger strike to commemorate the Tiananmen Massacre. Xu, a participant in the 1989 pro-democracy movement, was charged with “inciting subversion of state power,” and criminally detained on April 3.

Criminal Detention

MR YIN YUSHENG (殷雨声 aka Yu Sheng 雨声), an independent investigative journalist, was seized by police in Liaoning Province on June 21 and then handed over to police in Zhengzhou, Henan where he was criminally detained on suspicion of “gathering a crowd to disrupt order of a public place” on July 1. He was held in Luoyang City Detention Center until his release on “bail pending further investigation” on July 19. It is believed that Yin was taken into custody because he attended the memorial tribute in February for former Chinese leaders Hu Yaobang and Zhao Ziyang and victims of the 1989 massacre. A former 1989 student demonstrator, Yin was formerly with the state newspaper Chengdu Commercial Daily. He lost his job after reporting on a public security official’s son who tried to evade responsibility for killing a female student in a hit-and-run car accident at Hebei University in 2010 in the famous “My Father is Li Gang” case. He had earlier been seized by Hangzhou police in the evening of May 13 while in a restaurant with 10 other activists. He was taken to the Lingyinsi Police Station before being released.

MS ZHAO HUAXU (赵华旭), a 22-year-old university student from Beijing International Studies University, she was criminally detained on June 9 on a charge of “teaching the methods for the commission of a crime.” On May 24, Zhao sent out via Twitter an article titled “June 4 25th Anniversary, A Conceptual Plan for Fake Base Stations,” which hypothesized how to spread information on the Tiananmen Massacre and to promote a campaign to “Return to Tiananmen on June 4, 2014.” A “fake base station” can be utilized to rapidly send out a large number of cell phone text messages in a nearby area. Zhao warned in her article that, given the existing government crackdown on such stations, those who use the devices to spread information are likely to face criminal charges.

MS JIN LILI (金丽丽), a petitioner-activist from Beijing, was seized by police on June 7 and criminally detained the next day. She was held in Fengtai District Detention Center. Police conducted a search of her home and seized two computers and all of her petitioning material. They returned the next day to search her home again, and sealed the door. Jin was reportedly seized for taking part in a June Fourth commemoration activity with other petitioners. When she was released on July 11, she was in a wheelchair due to leg injuries sustained during mistreatment by police officers in the detention facility.

MR WU JIXIN (吴继新), a Xuzhou City, Jiangsu petitioner, Wu was seized from his residence in Beijing on the evening of June 4 by Beijing public order personnel and then criminally detained on charges of “creating a disturbance.” His home was searched, and his computer was seized by police. Wu was held at Dongcheng District Detention Center. He was released on “bail pending further investigation” on July 11.

MS DUAN SHULAN (段淑兰), a Hebei petitioner, was criminally detained on June 4 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance” while in Beijing. She was walking on Fuyou Street when police inspected her identity card and discovered she was a petitioner. They immediately took her into custody and then criminally detained her. Duan was held at Xicheng District Detention Center in Beijing before she was released on “bail pending further investigation” on July 11.

Zhu Tao

 

MR ZHU TAO (朱涛), a Wuhan citizen, was criminally detained on suspicion of “creating a disturbance” on June 4 after standing in Shouyi Square in Wuhan. He posted a photo on QQ of him wearing black to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Massacre. Police carried Zhu away that evening, and searched his home. He is currently being held in Hanyang District Detention Center. A worker at Wuhan Iron and Steel, Zhu has continuously taken part in citizen movements.

 

MR LÜ CHENG (), an activist from Hengyang City, Hunan, was taken away by police on June 3 and criminally detained on charges of “creating a disturbance.” He was held at Hengyang No. 2 Detention Center, and was released on July 8 on “bail pending further investigation.”

MR ZHANG KUN (张昆), a New Citizens’ Movement member and activist from Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province, was criminally detained on charges of “creating a disturbance” prior to June 4. He is being held at Xuzhou City Detention Center.

MR ZHANG YI (张毅), from Wuhan, was criminally detained on May 30 for “creating a disturbance” after he posted a message online. Zhang is being held in Dongxihu District Detention Center. He had posted a message on QQ soliciting ideas and comments on proposal for a demonstration that demanded work, dignity and right to survive. Zhang had gone to Qingshan District police station on April 21 with Pan Jianmin (潘建敏) to seek information about fellow activist Zhang Shiqing (张世清), but had his movements restricted and was warned by the head of a local police station. Zhang had taken part in the 1989 Tiananmen demonstrations and was injured as a result.

MR PAN JIANMIN (潘建敏), an engineer, was criminally detained on the night of 3 June by Wuhan Qingshan Prefecture police on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” He is being held at Qingshan Prefecture Detention Center. He is reportedly being held for holding a sign while going shopping, posting messages online, and taking part in an online forum that organized June Fourth commemoration activities. Pan’s younger brother was told by officers that the crime Pan Jianmin is suspected of may be changed to “inciting subversion of state power.” Mr. Pan, and project manager in his fifties, has long been involved in pro-democratic activities in Wuhan.

MR ZHAO MU (赵牧), the head of Sohu.com’s blog service, he was criminally detained in the early morning of June 4 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” Zhao is being held at Beijing No. 1 Detention Center. According to his family, his detention is related to a message and photo he posted online about the Cultural Revolution two days before his arrest.

MR ZHANG KUNLE (张坤乐), a Guangdong activist, was criminally detained on charges of “creating a disturbance” for calling for papers to be submitted about June 4th online. Zhang, who was born in 1989, works in Shenzhen on social and charitable issues, but was forcibly sent to his hometown of Chao Shan village in the lead up to June 4th. There, he posted a message online asking for submissions for articles that analyzed the 1989 student movement from any social science discipline, and promised to take the author of best-written paper for a meal. A few days after the message was posted, Chao Shan police criminally detained Zhang.

YIN ZHENGAN (尹正安), a longtime labor activist from Hunan Province, was criminally detained on May 31 by Shaoyang City police on a charge of “creating a disturbance.” Police also raided Yin’s home on June 4. Yin is being held at Shaoyang City Detention Center.

MR LUO QIAN (罗茜), a former Renmin University student leader in 1989, was taken away by Xinning County, Hunan national security officers on May 30 and criminally detained the next days later on charges of “creating a disturbance.” He was held at Dongkou County Detention Center, in Shaoyang City until his release on “bail pending further investigation” on June 30. Luo and his family were told by officers when he was initially taken away from his home that they were taking him “travelling,” a form of soft detention when an activist is taken from their city by police during sensitive times. The conditions of his bail means he is still under police restictions.

MR HUA YONG (华涌), a Beijing-based artist originally from Liaoning Province, was seized on May 26 and criminally detained on charges of “creating a disturbance.” He was held at Shangri-La Detention Center in Yunnan Province until his release on “bail pending further investigation” on June 25, after 30 days of detention. The bail notice was issued by the Tongzhou Public Security Sub-Bureau in Beijing, who reportedly instructed the Yunnan authorities to detain Hua. In 2012, he was criminally detained and send to RTL for 15 months for “creating a disturbance” after he staged a commemoration performance in Tiananmen Square on June 4.

MS CHEN JIANFANG (建芳), who went missing on May 13, had been criminally detained on suspicion of “gathering a crowd to disrupt order of a public place.” She was held at the Pudong New District No. 1 Detention Center  until June 12, when she was released on “bail pending further investigation.” Chen went out of contact when she and lawyer Liu Shihui (刘士辉) tried to file a lawsuit, and he was taken into custody. Chen, 43, has assisted victims of forced eviction in Shanghai and was a close associate of Cao Shunli (曹顺利), the activist who died in detention in mid-March, in the campaign to demand civil society participation in the Universal Periodic Review. The conditions of her bail means her movements are still are still restricted by police.

bdfyH8d0MR WANG AIZHONG (王爱忠), a Guangzhou-activist, was criminally detained on May 29 on suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” He was held in Tianhe District Detention Center until he was released on “bail pending further investigation” on June 25. Wang was first taken to “drink tea,” a euphuism for police questioning, by national security officers in the morning of the 29th, before police came to his home with a search warrant and executed a search later in the day. That evening he was put under criminal detention. Wang took part in the New Citizens’ Movement protests in 2013 and has had his movement restricted before for his activism. The conditions of his bail means his movements are still restricted by police.

MR LI ZHENGRAN (李铮然), from Hengyang City, Hunan, was criminally detained in the June 4th crackdown after being seized on May 28. National security officers told the family it was because he had planned to create a June 4th discussion group online. Li is being held at the Nanyue District Dentention Center in Hengyang City.

MS XIN JIAN (辛健), a Chongqing-based news assistant with Japan’s Nihon Keizai newspaper who had interviewed Pu Zhiqiang in the past, was taken into custody on May 13, and her family received the criminal detention notice on May 26. Xin Jian was sent to Beijing after being seized, and she was held of suspicion of “creating a disturbance.” On May 26, Xin’s husband Wang Haichun (王海春) released a message asking friends in Chongqing to take care of her parents and child if he goes missing, as he planned to hold a news conference the next day to expose details of his wife’s case, but later cancelled it. Xin was released on June 7.

CHEN JUNXIAN (陈俊贤), from Changsha City, Hunan, was criminally detained in the June 4th crackdown. Police seized Chen on May 24 at a restaurant with 11 other activists, and took them all to Left Jiatang Police Station in Changsha.

MR CHEN ZHAOZHI (陈兆志), a retired teacher from the University of Science and Technology in Beijing, Chen was criminally detained in Haidian District, Beijing in the second half of May. Chen was likely taken away because he had posted a commemoration for June 4th online, and calling for a political rehabilitation of the events. He had previously been criminally detained in May 2013 after taking part in the New Citizens’ Movement-led demonstrations demanding official transparency, and had been bailed after contracting a serious illness. It is unclear of his health status or if he is getting adequate medical treatment.

MR SHI YU (石玉), a Henan journalist, was taken away by police on May 26 and was criminally detained the next day on charges of “gathering a crowd to disrupt order of a public place.” His charges were later changed to “creating a disturbance.” Shi was detained after taking part in a June 4th public memorial service in Hua County, Henan Province on February 2. He was held at No. 3 Detention Center of the Zhengzhou City Public Security Bureau Prison Administration Department. When he was taken away by police, his home was searched and police confiscated his computer, hard drive, notebooks and iPad. On July 3, he was released on “bail pending further investigation.”

SHAO SHENGDONG (邵晟东), was criminally detained for taking part in the June 4th memorial service in February, and was held at the Zhengzhou No. 3 Detention Center. Shao was released on July 3 on “bail pending further investigation.”

MR LI XUEHUI (李学), a 50-year old Beijing-based activist, was taken away by police on May 20 and is under criminal detention on suspicion of organizing petitioners’ protests. Li’s home was searched and police took away his computer, books, and other materials. Li had worked with Wang Xiuying (王秀英), an 83-year old activist, to create badges commemorating June 4th. Li was an associate of Cao Shunli (曹顺利) and has been detained many times for his activism, including for a month in February 2014 after he tried visit Cao in hospital before her death.

Eight individuals were criminally detained in Hubei Province on May 17 on suspicion of “inciting subversion of state power,” while Sheng Guan (), an activist-turned-Buddhist priest, was giving a lecture on Buddhism at the Shangri-La Hotel in Wuhan. Police entered the hotel and detained all who had arrived. Sheng Guan is a veteran of the 1989 pro-democracy movement. Six were later released on “bail pending further investigation,” while Sheng Guan and one other individual were arrested.

MR MA QIANG (马强), was taken into custody on May 17, and criminally detained on suspicion of “inciting subversion of state power.” He was listening to a lecture by Buddhist monk Sheng Guan when Wuhan police seized him and several others. Ma was held at Jiang’an District Detention Center in Wuhan. He was released on “bail pending further investigation” on June 16, which means his movement is still restricted by police.

MR CHEN JIANXIONG (陈剑), was taken into custody on May 17, and criminally detained on suspicion of “inciting subversion of state power.” He was listening to a lecture by Buddhist monk Sheng Guan when Wuhan police seized him and several others. Chen was held at Jiang’an District Detention Center in Wuhan. He was released on “bail pending further investigation” on June 17, which means his movement is still restricted by police.

MR WAN LI (万里), was taken into custody on May 17, and criminally detained on suspicion of “inciting subversion of state power.” He was listening to a lecture by Buddhist monk Sheng Guan when Wuhan police seized him and several others. Wan was held at Jiang’an District Detention Center in Wuhan. He was released on “bail pending further investigation” on June 17, which means his movement is still restricted by police.

MR CHAI CONGFU (), was taken into custody on May 17, and criminally detained on suspicion of “inciting subversion of state power.” He was listening to a lecture by Buddhist monk Sheng Guan when Wuhan police seized him and several others. Chai was held at Jiang’an District Detention Center in Wuhan but was released on “bail pending further investigation” on June 25.

MS XIE LI (), was taken into custody on May 17, and was criminally detained on suspicion of “inciting subversion of state power.” She was listening to a lecture by Buddhist monk Sheng Guan when Wuhan police seized her and several others. Xie was released on “bail pending further investigation.”

MS LI WENSHAN (李文禅), was taken into custody on May 17, and was criminally detained on suspicion of “inciting subversion of state power.” She listening to a lecture by Buddhist monk Sheng Guan when Wuhan police seized her and several others. Li was released on bail on May 19 because she suffers from high-blood pressure.

MR LIU WEI (刘伟), a 27-year old netizen, was forcibly returned to Chongqing from Beijing and criminally detained on charges of “creating a disturbance” on May 17. Liu has since been put into the Leshan City Psychiatric Hospital after authorities threatened his parents. He travelled to Beijing in April to visit a friend and took a photo of himself in Tiananmen Square, which is believed to have led to his detention. In 2011, Liu Wei was sentenced to two years of Re-education through Labor after posting information online about the “Jasmine Revolution,” and authorities have monitored Liu since his release in January 2013.

MS ZHANG JINFENG (张金风), a Shandong activist, was criminally detained on May 17 on charges of “creating a disturbance” in Beijing. She went missing after taking part in a June Fourth commemoration activity and delivering a letter signed by many activists which paid respects to the Tiananmen Mothers. From Ji’nan City, Zhang was released on June 17 after 30 days in detention on “bail pending investigation.” Upon her return home, she discovered her home had been searched and many of her belongings had been seized. Many activists believed Zhang had been taken “travelling” over June 4, but she failed to return home after others were released. It was leaked by the local police station in her area that she was taken away by Beijing police.

MR LIU SHIHUI (刘士辉), a 49-year old Guangzhou-based lawyer, was criminally detained on May 14 in Shanghai and released into the custody of national security officers from Inner Mongolia on May 26. Liu was held on charges of “gathering a crowd to disrupt the order of a public place” at Pudong New District Detention Center, before he was released and forcibly returned to Inner Mongolia. Liu reported he suffered a hand injury while being violently taken to the airport from the detention center. Liu had gone to Shanghai to represent activist Chen Jianfang (陈建芳) at a hearing on May 13 for a lawsuit that Chen filed seeking public information from the Pudong District Public Security Bureau. Police turned Liu away from the courtroom and later took him into custody. Authorities declined requests by his lawyer Zhang Lei (张磊) for a meeting until May 21, when he found that Liu was weak and gaunt, and that Liu did not even recognize him at first. In recent years, police have detained, threatened, and tortured Liu in retaliation for defending a wide range of human rights cases, and authorities have revoked his law license.

Several activists were criminally detained on May 10 after trying to monitor a court trial involving Guangdong activist Li Weiguo (李维国). Li had filed a complaint over his detention and deprivation of assembly rights that occurred in 2013 after he and others had applied to hold a demonstration on June Fourth. Li had been taken into custody by Haizhu police in late May of 2013 and then served a 15-day administrative detention. A lower court heard Li’s case in January and upheld the original punishment, finding it legally justified.

MR LUO XIANGYANG (罗向阳), from Guangdong, was criminally detained for “creating a disturbance” on May 10 after being seized outside the Guangzhou City Intermediate People’s Court on May 5. Seized by Foshan City officers, he was held in Nanhai District Detention Center until his release after June 4th.

MR WU BIN (吴斌, who uses the screen name Youcai Jianghu, 秀才江湖), from Guangdong, was criminally detained for “creating a disturbance” on May 10 after being seized outside the Guangzhou City Intermediate People’s Court on May 5. Held in the Foshan City Chancheng Detention Center, he was released on June 3 and held under restrictions by national security officers until June 5.

MR XIE WENFEI (谢文飞), from Guangdong, was criminally detained for “creating a disturbance” on May 10 after being seized outside the Guangzhou City Intermediate People’s Court on May 5. Held in the Foshan City Chancheng Detention Center, he was released on June 4, and is reportedly in poor health now.

MR YANG CHONG (杨崇), from Guangdong, was criminally detained for “creating a disturbance” on May 10 after being seized outside the Guangzhou City Intermediate People’s Court on May 5. Held in the Foshan City Chancheng Detention Center, he was released on June 5.

MS ZHANG WANHE (张皖荷), from Guangdong, was criminally detained for “creating a disturbance” on May 10 after being seized outside the Guangzhou City Intermediate People’s Court on May 5. Seized by Foshan City officers, she was held in Nanhai District Detention Center until her release after June 4th.

MS WU WEI (吴微), who frequently interviewed lawyer Pu Zhiqiang during her career as a Beijing-based journalist, was criminally detained on charges of “creating a disturbance.” She initially disappeared on May 7 after being taken away by state security officers. Her last weibo post, sent out on that same day, discussed Pu’s case. Wu, now an adviser for the International Center for Communication Development, used to work for the South China Morning Post in Beijing. Wu was released on June 7.

MR CHEN GUANG (陈光), a former PLA soldier turned artist, Chen was taken away by Beijing police on May 7 and was being held at Tongzhou District Detention Center until his release on June 13. It was likely he was criminally detained, though its unclear on what charges. The detention of Chen, a soldier who helped clear up Tiananmen Square after the government crackdown, is probably related to a piece of performance art he gave on April 29, which touched upon the event.

Approximately 20 human rights lawyers, dissidents, and family members of June Fourth victims attended a seminar in Beijing on May 3, where they discussed unresolved issues about the Tiananmen Massacre and called for investigation of the truth surrounding the tragic events.

Many participants at a “Commemorating June Fourth Seminar,” held on May 3 in Beijing, were criminally detained, including lawyer Pu Zhiqiang (浦志强, at front right).

Many participants at a “Commemorating June Fourth Seminar,” held on May 3 in Beijing, were criminally detained, including lawyer Pu Zhiqiang (浦志强, at front right).

MR HAO JIAN (郝建), a Beijing Film Academy professor and critic, was seized after taking part in the seminar held in his home, and was criminally detained on charges of “creating a disturbance” on May 6. Hao was held at Beijing No. 1 Detention Center until he was released on “bail pending further investigation” in the afternoon of June 5, after spending 31 days in detention. His movement is still restricted, such as not being allowed to leave the city, write articles or conduct other activities for up to one year without police permission. Hao lost a cousin in the Tiananmen Massacre.

MR HU SHIGEN (胡石根), a dissident writer, was seized after taking part in the seminar and was criminally detained on charges of “creating a disturbance” on May 6. Hu was held at Beijing No. 1 Detention Center until he was released on “bail pending further investigation” in the afternoon of June 5, after spending 31 days in detention. His movement is still restricted, such as not being allowed to leave the city, write articles or conduct other activities for up to one year without police permission.

MS LIU DI (刘荻), a writer/blogger, was seized after taking part in the seminar and was criminally detained on charges of “creating a disturbance” on May 6. She was held at Beijing No. 1 Detention Center. On May 9, Liu was denied a scheduled visit from her lawyers Ma Gangquan (马纲权) and Ding Xikui (丁锡奎). Authorities from the detention center said that she was being arraigned when the attorneys arrived. The lawyers waited for several hours after being told that she was unavailable, and they were advised to come back on May 12 to see her. Liu Di, who has written online under the name “Stainless Steel Mouse,” first rose to prominence in 2002 after being detained for satirizing the government’s Internet restrictions. Liu was released on “bail pending further investigation” in the afternoon of June 5 after spending 31 days in detention. Her movement is still restricted, such as not being allowed to leave the city, write articles or conduct other activities for up to one year without police permission.

MR XU YOUYU (徐友渔), a scholar retired from the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, was seized after taking part in the seminar and was criminally detained on charges of “creating a disturbance” on May 6. Xu was held at Beijing No. 1 Detention Center until Xu was released on “bail pending further investigation” in the afternoon of June 5, after spending 31 days in detention. During a visit with Xu, lawyers Mo Shaoping (莫少平) and Shang Baojun (尚宝军) observed that Xu looked frail. In addition, Xu told them that his blood pressure is high and that police have not permitted him to take any diabetic medicine that Xu himself brought into detention. Xu Youyu, one of the original signatories to Charter 08, the manifesto promoting political reform and democratization in China, witnessed the 1989 demonstrations in Tiananmen Square. The conditions of his bail means his movement is still restricted, such as not being allowed to leave the city, write articles or conduct other activities for up to one year without police permission.

Administrative Detention

MR LIU SHAOMING (刘少明), a worker and activist from Jiangxi, was administratively detained by Guangzhou police for 10 days on June 4 for “incitement or engineering an illegal gathering, parade or demonstration.” Liu, who had been held under house arrest since May 26, had been summoned for questioning by police from Huadu District on June 3. Upon his release, his detention certificate also listed the crime “organising and inciting other to engage in activities of cults.” Liu took part in the 1989 student demonstrations and had been jailed for a year as a result. He has also taken part in activities in support of Liu Ping (刘萍) and the Xinyu activists, as well as the four lawyers in Jiansanjiang.

ZHOU YAHUA (周亚华), an online activist Yueyang City, Hunan, was administratively detained for 10 days in the June 4th crackdown. Zhou went on a hunger strike while in detention to protest his deprivation of liberty and rights.

MA SHENGFEN (马胜芬), an activist from Guangdong, was give an 10-day adminsitrative detention on May 31, after he was seized on the way to a armed police hospital with Zhang Shengyu (张胜雨). Ma was released on June 11.

MR ZHANG SHENGYU (张圣雨 aka ZHANG RONGPING 张荣平), an activist from Guangdong, has been missing since May 31, when he was seized after accompanying  to a armed police hospital. The two activists from the “Southern Street Movement” were given 10 day administrative detentions, and Ma was released on June 11. Zhang has still not returned home, and his family have not received any information from police.

MR FAN YIPING (范一平), a Guangzhou activist, was administratively detained on May 27 for 15-days for “creating a disturbance” and released on June 10. Police first took Fan “travelling” for two days, before searching his home and detaining him. Fan has previously been imprisoned for his activism.

HUANG YIJIAN (黄怡剑), from Hengyang City, Hunan, was administratively detained in the June 4th crackdown.

TAN AIJUN (谭爱军), a Yulin City, Guangxi activist, was taken away by police on June 3. Tan was given a 5-day administrative detention.

LI XIAOLONG (黎小龙), a Yulin City, Guangxi activist, was taken away by police on June 3. Li was given a 5-day administrative detention.

Zhang Wei

 

 

MR ZHANG WEI (张维), a Guangxi activist, he was taken away by police on June 3 and was later given a 10-day administrative detention. Hours before he was seized, Zhang had posted a photo online of him commemorating June 4th with three other activists, including Duan Qixian (端启宪). Officers from Jianshe Police Station seized Zhang as he walked home, and have not given any information of his whereabouts to the family. Zhang

 

 

MR GUO JIAN (郭建), a Chinese-Australian artist, he was taken away by police on June 1, and given a 15-day administrative detention. Guo was held in a suburban Beijing detention center on a visa-related charged, and will be deported. The Australian Embassy in Beijing reported it had been in contact with Chinese authorities. It is believed his detention comes after an interview he gave with Financial Times, where he discussed his private commemoration of June 4th with artwork, including a diorama of Tiananmen Square covered in 160 kilograms of meat. Guo was a PLA soldier during the Sino-Vietnamese war, and staged a 7-day hunger strike in 1989 in solidarity with the student demonstrators in 1989.

MR ZHANG QI (张起), a Chongqing coordinator for the Independent Chinese PEN, was put under administrative detention for 10 days on June 2 after he interviewed Hu Jia (胡佳) on May 31. Chongqing police took Zhang away on June 1, and detained him the next day. Zhang’s interview with Hu was to be put online if anything happened to Hu, however police also linked his detention to a discussion he had on Twitter with a friend several months before about “returning to Tiananmen.” Authorities had cut off his Internet weeks prior to the anniversary and warned him to not conduct any activities to commemorate June Fourth. Zhang said police deleted materials off his hard drive and possibly implanted surveillance equipment into his mobile phone. Zhang, 31, has been holding commemoration activities for the Tiananmen Massacre for several years and has been jailed before for his writings.

MS LI HONGWEI (李红卫), a Shandong activist, was given a seven-day administrative detention on May 25 in order to block her and her husband Chen Qingquan (陈清泉) from commemorating the 25th anniversary of June 4th during her birthday dinner. Plainclothes police were monitoring the restaurant in Jinan City, and after Chen took a photo of the police, they beat him and took him and Li away in a police car. Li began her activism in 2007 when her home was forcibly demolished, and has been sentenced to Re-education through Labor and held black jails in retaliation for her activism.

MR CHEN QINGQUAN (陈清泉), the husband of Shandong activist Li Hongwei (李红卫), was given a five-day administrative detention after police dragged him and his wife away from her birthday dinner on May 25. Chen was beaten by police after he took a photo of them in the restaurant, where officers were monitoring the group.

Several activists were administratively detained on May 5 for “creating a disturbance” after going to Shaoyang City to pay tribute to the 1989 labor leader Li Wangyang (李旺阳). Li died under mysterious circumstances in a hospital while in police custody around the June Fourth anniversary in 2012.

MR LI JIANJUN (黎建军) was given a five-day administrative detention by Hunan police on May 5. A few weeks later he was summoned by Huaihua City national security officers for questioning and warned that he will not be allowed out during June 4th. Guangzhou national security officers questioned Li about lawyer Tang Jingling (唐荆陵), and they searched his home, confiscating rights materials Tang had sent. Li was released from soft detention on June 6th.

MR ZHANG SHANGUANG (张善光) was given a five-day administrative detention by Hunan police on May 5. From Huaihua, Zhang was then taken in by national security officers on May 29 to “drink tea,” a euphemism for police questioning. Zhang was warned not to participate in any June 4th commemoration activities, and his movements are being strictly monitored.

MR OU BIAOFENG (欧彪峰) was given a five-day administrative detention by Hunan police on May 5.

Detained

On the evening of May 13, 11 activists were seized by police while having dinner in Hangzhou who believed they were taking part in a June 4th commemoration activity. Four were taken to Lingyinsi Police Station, and it is unclear where the other seven were taken.

Police seized 11 activists who were eating dinner on May 13 in Hangzhou

Police seized 11 activists who were eating dinner on May 13 in Hangzhou

WANG YI (王译), was seized by police in the evening of May 13 while in a restaurant with 10 other activists. Wang was taken to the Lingyinsi Police Station in Hangzhou.

HUA CHUNHUI (华春辉), was seized by police in the evening of May 13 while in a restaurant with 10 other activists. Hua was taken to the Lingyinsi Police Station in Hangzhou.

LIU NINGJUN (刘宁军), was seized by police in the evening of May 13 while in a restaurant with 10 other activists. Liu was taken to the Lingyinsi Police Station in Hangzhou.

MO ZHIXU (莫之许), was seized by Hangzhou police in the evening of May 13 while in a restaurant with 10 other activists.

WANG WUSI (王五四), was seized by Hangzhou police in the evening of May 13 while in a restaurant with 10 other activists.

DENG KAI (邓凯), was seized by Hangzhou police in the evening of May 13 while in a restaurant with 10 other activists.

YU HAIQIAN (余怀谦), was seized by Hangzhou police in the evening of May 13 while in a restaurant with 10 other activists.

ZHUANG DAOHE (庄道鹤), was seized by Hangzhou police in the evening of May 13 while in a restaurant with 10 other activists.

FEI (just surname is known ), was seized by Hangzhou police in the evening of May 13 while in a restaurant with 10 other activists.

WEN KEJIAN (温克坚), was seized by Hangzhou police in the evening of May 13 while in a restaurant with 10 other activists.

TONG SHIDONG (佟适冬), a Changsha activist, was seized by police on May 24 at a restaurant with 11 other activists. Police took them to Left Jiatang Police Station in Changsha.

XIE CHANGZHEN (谢长桢), a Changsha activist, was seized by police on May 24 at a restaurant with 11 other activists. Police took them to Left Jiatang Police Station in Changsha.

WUYE FEIYING (only screen name is known 雾夜飞鹰), a Changsha activist, was seized by police on May 24 at a restaurant with 11 other activists. Police took them to Left Jiatang Police Station in Changsha.

ZHOUZHOU ZHUZHOU (only screen name is known 周周煮粥), a Changsha activist, was seized by police on May 24 at a restaurant with 11 other activists. Police took them to Left Jiatang Police Station in Changsha.

XIAO BIAO (only screen name is known 小彪), a Changsha activist, was seized by police on May 24 at a restaurant with 11 other activists. Police took them to Left Jiatang Police Station in Changsha.

MR ZHANG HAITAO (张海涛), a Xinjiang activist, he was seized by police outside his house on June 4 and taken to Zhangya South Street Police Station and held for one day before being released.

Enforced Disappearance

MR ZHANG SHENGYU (张圣雨 aka ZHANG RONGPING 张荣平), an activist from Guangdong, has been missing since May 31, when he was seized after accompanying Ma Shengfen (马胜芬) to a armed police hospital. Zhang and Ma were given 10 day administrative detentions, and Ma was released on June 11.  An activist from the “Southern Street Movement,” CHRD has not received any information on whether Zhang has returned home, or if his family have received information from police.

WANG YI (王怡), a Chengdu-based church leader, Wang was seized from his home by seven or eight officers and taken to the Gongye Park Police Station in Wuhou District on June 4. The leader of the Autumn Rain Church of Christ, Wang had organized a ‘National Prayer’ and fast for June 4, but had been warned by police the day before not to hold it. Police then cut the water and power to the church’s building in order to block the prayer on the 4th, and later seized Wang. Wang began the church in 2005, and later brought a lawsuit against the Religious Affairs Bureau after they tried to block the formal establishment.

MR YE DU (野渡 also known as Wu Wei 吴伟), a member of the Independent Chinese PEN center, he was taken away by Guangzhou police.

MR WANG DEBANG (王德邦), a former 1989 student leader, was abruptly seized away from his home in Guilin, Guangxi Province by police on June 3, who refuse to tell his family where they took him, and  was held for two days until June 5. Wang was then taken away by police again on June 17 for posting an essay online about June 4th. His current whereabouts are unknown. He had been previously warned by national security officers not to commemorate June 4th. Wang was also one of the original signatories of Charter 08.

Soft Detention

MS WANG LIPING (王莉萍), a 71-year old petitioner from Xi’an, was taken to a “black jail” on June 4th.

MS ZHANG QUNXUAN (张群选), the wife of jailed dissident Chen Xi (陈西), was taken forcibly travelling on June 4-5 by national security officers in Guiyang City, Guizhou Province with their daughter. Zhang suffers from severe diabeties and had been hospitalised prior to being put under soft detention.

HUANG YANMING (黄燕明), a activist from Guizhou, was taken forcibly “travelling” by police from Weiqing Police Station on May 31. Huang said he was held in a guesthouse in the courtyard of the Guizhou High People’s Court, essentially a “black jail”, until his release on June 8.

MR MI CHONGBIAO (糜崇彪), an activist from Guizhou, Mi and his wife were held under house arrest after taking part in a June 4th commemoration event.

MS LI KEZHEN (李克珍), the wife of Mi Chongbiao (糜崇彪), she was held under house arrest with her husband.

MR SUN JUCHANG (孙举昌), a dissident from Qingdao, Shandong Province, was in Beijing with his wife before police seized them on May 27. They were forcibly sent back to their hometown where their movements were controlled.

OUYANG JINGHUA (欧阳经华), from Shaoyang City, Hunan, was held under house arrest during the June 4th crackdown.

TANG HAIDING (唐海丁), from Shaoyang City, Hunan, was held under house arrest during the June 4th crackdown.

YANG SHENG (杨圣), from Shaoyang City, Hunan, was held under house arrest during the June 4th crackdown.

LIU SHAOHUA (刘少华), from Shaoyang City, Hunan, was held under house arrest during the June 4th crackdown.

ZHAO ZHIHUA (赵志华), from Shaoyang City, Hunan, was held under house arrest during the June 4th crackdown.

LI ZANMIN (李赞民), from Shaoyang City, Hunan, was held under house arrest during the June 4th crackdown.

MR DUAN QIXIAN (端启宪), a Nanning City activist, he was put under house arrest by Guangxi police until June 5. Duan had posed in a photo posted online of him commemorating June 4th with three other activists, including Zhang Wei (张维) who was given a 10-day administrative detention.

MS DING ZILIN (丁子林), the head of the Tiananmen Mothers, was taken away from her home in Beijing and put under house arrest from June 4-7. Ding, whose son was killed in the Tiananmen Square massacre, has been campaigning for truth and accountability. According to her, the suppression of the Tiananmen Mothers under the leadership of Xi Jinping has been far greater that ever before.

MR LI DEMING (李德茗), a Hunan activist, was held under house arrest at a guesthouse until being released on June 8. Fenghuang County authorities took Li away and restricted his access to Internet and mobile phones as well. From the Huangxi Tujia and Miao Autonomous Prefecture, Li was a veteran of the Vietnam War and worked with veteran petitioners and on ethnic minority rights.

MR FENG ZHENGHU (冯正虎), a Shanghai activist, was placed under house arrest on June 3 to restrict his movements around the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Massacre. Feng was one of the initial signatories of Charter 08.

Starting on May 20, approximately 16 Beijing activists, dissidents and scholars, many of whom were involved in the 1989 movement, have been under 24-hour strict monitoring, or were forcibly taken “travelling” by authorities out of Beijing.

MR ZHOU DUO (周舵), a constitutional scholar, he had been under 24-hour surveillance starting on May 20 in Beijing. Zhou was imprisoned for a year for his role in the pro-democracy protests in 1989.

MR CAO SIYUAN (曹思源), a dissident scholar, he had been under 24-hour surveillance starting on May 20 in Beijing.

MR ZHANG ZUHUA (张祖桦), a human rights and democracy activist, he had been under 24-hour surveillance starting May 20 in Beijing.

MR HU JIA (胡佳), a 40 year-old Beijing-based rights activist, was under house arrest from February 24, 2014 to June 8, with 24-hour surveillance starting on May 20. Though freed from house arrest, he is still under constant surveillance, as he has been since 2004, except for the period from 2008-2011 when he was in prison.

MR LI HAI (李海), a former student leader in 1989, he had been under 24-hour surveillance starting on May 20 in Beijing.

MR HE DEPU (何德浦), a Chinese dissident, he had been under 24-hour surveillance starting on May 20 in Beijing.

MS YE JINGCHUN (野靖春), an activist, she had been under 24-hour surveillance starting on May 20 in Beijing.

MR LI JINPING (李金平), an activist, he had been under 24-hour surveillance starting on May 20 in Beijing.

MR KANG YUCHUN (康玉春), a pro-democracy activist, he had been under 24-hour surveillance starting on May 20 in Beijing.

MR BAO TONG (鲍彤), former political secretary of CCP Secretary-General Zhao Ziyang (赵紫阳), he had been forcibly taken “travelling” by authorities in order to leave Beijing before June 4th.

MR ZHA JIANGUO (查建国), a democracy activist, had been forcibly taken “travelling” by authorities in order to leave Beijing before June 4th. He is a veteran of the Democracy Wall Movement.

MR GAO HONGMING (高洪明), a democracy activist, he had been forcibly taken “travelling” by authorities in order to leave Beijing before June 4th. He is a veteran of the Democracy Wall Movement.

MR YAN ZHENGXUE (严正学), a dissident artist, he had been forcibly taken “travelling” by authorities in order to leave Beijing before June 4th.

MS ZHU CHUNLIU (朱春柳), wife of Yan Zhengxue, she had been forcibly taken “travelling” by authorities in order to leave Beijing before June 4th.

MR QI ZHEYONG (齐志勇), an activist who was wounded in the 1989 Tiananmen Massacre, he had been forcibly taken “travelling” by authorities in order to leave Beijing before June 4th.

MS QI YUEYING (齐月英), a victim of a forced demolition of her home and activist, she had been forcibly taken “travelling” by authorities in order to leave Beijing before June 4th.

MR HU JUN (胡军), a 48-year old Xinjiang activist, had his home searched on May 27, and was later placed under six-month residential surveillance on suspicion of “inciting subversion of state power.” Changji Prefecture police confiscated his computer, phone, external hard drive and other materials. He had previously been summoned for questioning on May 4. Hu Jun is a paraplegic, who continues to advocate on behalf of petitioners and has been monitored for a long time as a result.

MR YANG HAI (杨海), a Xi’an based activist, was taken “travelling” by national security officers on May 27 in order to ensure he would be away for June 4th. According to his younger brother, police searched Yang’s home on May 30. Held for 10 days, Yang was released on June 6. Yang was a former student leader in the 1989 pro-democracy protests.

MR LI RENKE (李任科), a democracy activist from Guiyang City, Guizhou Province, was taken away by police on May 20 and held in a “black jail” in the mountains until June 10, in a bid by authorities to keep him away during June 4th.

MR MA XIAOMING (马晓明), a Xi’an-based activist, had been held under strict 24-hour house arrest starting on May 20. Ma is frequently put under house arrest during visits to Xi’an from foreign dignitaries or central government inspectors, and every year on June 4th his movement is restricted. A former journalist, Ma Xiaoming lost his job after joining the Tiananmen pro-democracy movement in 1989.

MR TAN KAI (谭凯), an environmental activist and member of the China Democracy Party in Zhejiang, who was detained at same time as Xu Guang (徐光) on May 9, has been released but reportedly placed under “residential surveillance.”

Summoned/Questioned by Police

ZHOU JIE (周杰), from Changsha, Hunan, was taken to “drink tea” by police and warned about commemorating June 4th.

SHAO JIAJUN (邵佳均), from Changsha, Hunan, was taken to “drink tea” by police and warned about commemorating June 4th.

QIAN HUI (钱辉), from Changsha, Hunan, was taken to “drink tea” by police and warned about commemorating June 4th.

FAN JUNYI (樊均益), from Changsha, Hunan, was taken to “drink tea” by police and warned about commemorating June 4th.

LIANG TAIPING (梁太平), from Changsha, Hunan, was taken to “drink tea” by police and warned about commemorating June 4th.

ZHU CHENGZHI (朱承志), a Hunan activist living in Kunming, Yunnan Province, was taken in for question on June 4 by officers from Xihua County Police Station in Xishan District, Kunming.

MR LI JIANJUN (李建军), an activist from Huaihua, Hunan, was taken in by national security officers on May 29 to “drink tea,” a euphemism for police questioning. Li was warned not to participate in any June 4th commemoration activities, and Li’s movements are being strictly monitored.

MR HUANG YONGHUA (黄勇华) was brought in by Hunan national security officers “to drink tea,” a euphemism for police questioning, on May 27. They questioned him on what June 4th activities he was involved in, and warned him not to take part in any events or make online statements. He was also told not to leave Hengyang City. Huang has had his movements controlled around June 4th for the past two years.

MR AN NING (安宁), a democracy activist, was seized by Zhengzhou City, Henan police and held for 24 hours. Police searched his house and confiscated a computer. An Ning was a student during the 1989 pro-democracy protests and was arrested and sent to jail as a result.

MR GUO YONGFENG (郭永丰), a democracy activist, was summoned for questioning on May 22-23 by Shenzhen national security officers and told that his movements will be restricted on June 4th. He was told that from May 24 until June 7, he would not be allowed to make any public statements and must completely cease all online activity. Guo is a signatory of Charter 08 and the founder of the Citizens’ Association for Government Oversight (公民监政会), and has previously been retaliated against for his activism, including being sent to Re-education through Labor.

MR LÜ GENGSONG (吕耿松), a Hangzhou Democracy Party member, had his home searched by seven or eight officers, and was summoned for questioning by police on May 12. Police seized a computer, two mobile phones, as well as other materials after arriving in the afternoon with a search warrant. Police then took him to Cuiyuan Police Station in the West Lake District for questioning on unclear grounds.

MS CUI WEIPING (崔卫平), a professor at Beijing Film Academy, was summoned for questioning after taking part in the June 4th seminar in Beijing on May 3 and was subsequently released.

MS GUO YUHUA (郭于华), a Qinghua University professor, was summoned for questioning after taking part in the June 4th seminar in Beijing on May 3 and was subsequently released.

MR QIN HUI (秦晖), a scholar, was summoned for questioning after taking part in the June 4th seminar in Beijing on May 3 and was subsequently released.

MS LIANG XIAOYAN (梁晓燕), a scholar and writer, was summoned for questioning after taking part in the June 4th seminar in Beijing on May 3 and was subsequently released.

Home Searches

MS WANG XIUYING (王秀英), an 83-year old activist, had her home searched by Beijing police on May 22 after she signed a petition commemorating the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Massacre. Wang also helped activist Li Xuehui (李学慧) create June 4th posters. Police confiscated her computer, camera, and June 4th materials. Wang had previously been sent to Re-education through Labor during the 2008 Olympics.