(Updated January 3)

CHRD has compiled a collection of reports documenting how Chinese citizens have reacted to the news that Liu Xiaobo was awarded the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize, and also how the Chinese government has acted to limit the spread of this information and prevent public or private commemorations of Liu’s achievement. This article will be updated as new information becomes available.

Police Begin Easing Pressure on Some Activists Following Nobel Ceremony

Police have begun easing the pressure on some activists following the Nobel Peace Prize award ceremony, making those cases in which activists have not been released increasingly worrying. CHRD is currently collecting reports of individuals who have regained their freedom of movement, as well as those facing continued restrictions.

  • On December 31, police in Shaanxi Province released activist Zhao Changqing (赵常青) after more than two months of soft detention. Zhao returned to Xi’an City from Shanyang County, where he had been held since October 25. Before this period of soft detention, Zhao was also administratively detained for eight days in Beijing for celebrating the news that Liu Xiaobo had been awarded the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize.
  • On December 21, Ding Zilin (丁子霖), founder of the Tiananmen Mothers, and her husband Jiang Peikun (蒋培坤) returned to their home in Beijing, and on December 22 they were allowed to begin contacting friends and family for the first time since they were placed under “soft detention” on October 8. Ding and Jiang had been held incommunicado in a rural location outside of Wuxi City, Jiangsu Province, where they had been staying when the Prize was announced. The couple have written an article about their experiences during the past few months, which is available here (in Chinese).
  • On the afternoon of December 18, Beijing human rights activist Wang Lihong (王荔蕻) returned home following 18 days of “forced travel.” However, police told Wang that, now that she was home, she was not permitted to leave her home except in the company of police. Officers are standing guard outside of her apartment building 24 hours a day.[i]
  • On December 20, human rights lawyer Zhang Jiankang (张鉴康) returned to Xi’an City, Shaanxi Province following 12 days of “forced travel.”
  • Beijing democracy and human rights activist Li Hai (李海) was allowed to return home on the evening of December 15 after 46 days of soft detention. After he was seized on October 30, Li was held in an underground room in Beijing’s Chaoyang District for 16 days before being transferred to a guesthouse near Zuojiazhuang, also in Chaoyang District.
  • As of December 17, CHRD has no updates regarding the case of Shen Minqiang (沈民强), who was criminally detained on October 8 for speaking out about Liu Xiaobo’s Nobel Prize, accepting media interviews, and giving out his calling card outside of Liu’s home. Since human rights lawyer Teng Biao (滕彪) reported Shen’s detention on November 9, activists affiliated with CHRD have been unsuccessful in obtaining more detailed information despite numerous attempts.
  • Xi’an City, Shaanxi Province-based activist Yang Hai (杨海) was finally allowed to return home from “forced travel” on December 17.
  • On December 13 and 14, 11 Guizhou human rights defenders and members of the Guizhou Human Rights Forum—including Huang Yanming (黄燕明), Li Renke (李任科), Wang Zang (王藏), Shen Youlian (申有连), Du Heping (杜和平), Mo Jiangang (莫建刚), Zhang Zhongfa (张重发), Lu Yongxiang (卢永祥), Xu Guoqing (徐国庆), Chen Xi (陈西), and Zeng Ning (曾宁)—returned home from “forced travel” or soft detention. However, as of December 14, two—Liao Shuangyuan (廖双元), and Wu Yuqin (吴玉琴)—were still missing.
  • Prominent Beijing human rights attorney Mo Shaoping (莫少平), who was taken away from his office on December 10 and held under soft detention at a place called Jiuhuashanzhuang, outside of Beijing. He returned home on December 11, but as of December 12 his cell phone was unable to function.
  • Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region human rights activist Wang Debang (王德邦), who was taken away from his home at 4pm on December 10 by national security officers, who also confiscated his personal computer. He returned home on December 11.
  • Beijing human rights activist and Charter 08 co-organizer Zhang Zuhua (张祖桦), who was abducted off the street near his home by police officers. Zhang was allowed to return home on December 12, but his home internet and telephone connections are still cut, and police remain stationed outside of his home.

In addition to the cases listed above, the following individuals have regained their freedom after being taken from their homes and placed under soft detention or “forced to travel” by police:

  • Beijing democracy activist Hu Shigen (胡石根) returned home on December 12;
  • Wuhan democracy activist Qin Yongmin (秦永敏) returned home on December 12;
  • Hubei activist Yao Lifa (姚立法) returned home on December 12;
  • Beijing activist Li Zhiying (李智英) returned home on December 12;

A number of individuals under soft detention or surveillance and restriction on movement, including Hangzhou scholar Wen Kejian (温克坚), Beijing activist and professor Xu Zhiyong (许志永), Beijing author Zhang Dajun (张大军), and Beijing dissident Gao Hongming (高洪明) regained their freedom of movement on December 12.

More Activists Taken Away as Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony is Held

As the world focused its attention on the Nobel Peace Prize award ceremony in Oslo, Norway, the attention of the Chinese police apparatus remained on ensuring that activists and dissidents would not be able to speak out or gather in celebration of the event. On December 10, police continued their efforts to detain, harass, and silence activists and dissidents around the country.

Collecting reports of harassment and detention in the past few days has been hindered by the fact that, since December 7, the internet service and/or cell phone service of the majority of Chinese activists and dissidents has been disrupted to some degree. The cases presented, therefore, are not a comprehensive list, but rather representative examples of the conditions Chinese activists are currently facing. On December 10:

Those taken from their homes and forced to “travel” or placed under soft detention included:

  • Beijing human rights lawyer and professor Teng Biao (滕彪), who was seized by police on December 9 after teaching a class at China Political Science and Law and taken to Yanqing County, outside Beijing. He was told he would be held until December 12.
  • Beijing scholar Cui Weiping (崔卫平), who was taken to an undisclosed location on the outskirts of Beijing on December 9.
  • Beijing journalist Gao Yu (高瑜) and her husband, who were taken to the airport on December 9 by police. Their current whereabouts are unknown.
  • Beijing author Yu Jie (余杰), who was taken from his home on December 9.
  • Xi’an City human rights activist Yang Hai (杨海), who was taken to a location on the outskirts of the city on December 9 and told he would be held until December 12. Yang protested that he needed to stay and care for his mother, who is ill, but police forcibly dragged him away. Police did not set him free on December 12, but promised to allow him to return home on December 15.
  • Xi’an City human rights lawyer Zhang Jiankang (张鉴康), who was also caring for his ailing mother when police arrived to take him away on December 9.
  • Xi’an City activists Fu Sheng (傅升) and Ma Xiaoming (马晓明), who are believed to have been taken away as well on December 9 as well, but about whom CHRD does not presently have detailed information

Additionally, on December 10:

  • Guangzhou City, Guangdong Province author Ye Du (野渡) was called for “tea” by police.
  • Zhejiang Province-based activist and village head Jiang Miaotu (蒋苗土) was placed under soft detention in a Beijing guesthouse.
  • Hunan Province dissident Li Jianjun (黎建军) was called for “lunch and tea” with national security officers, who warned him to “think of his family” and not meet with others to celebrate the Nobel prize.
  • Sichuan Province activist Chen Yunfei (陈云飞) was seized by police off the street in Chengdu City, where he was passing out copies of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and detained him in a local police station. He was released on December 11 after 27 hours of detention.
  • Nanjing City, Jiangsu Province dissident Li Yong (李勇) was called for a “chat” by national security police.
  • Suining City, Sichuan Province dissident and activist Chen Wei (陈卫) was called for a “chat” by national security police at 3 pm, and by midnight had yet to return home.
  • Jinan City, Shangdong Province dissident and retired professor Sun Wenguang (孙文广) was taken from his home by police and placed under soft detention. He returned home on December 11

Individuals who had their internet service cut off or their cell phone use limited (they may place outgoing calls, but cannot receive incoming calls in the last few days include:

  • Beijing scholar Xu Youyu (徐友渔)
  • Beijing activist Fan Yafeng (范亚峰), who was then taken away by police
  • Beijing artist and activist Ai Weiwei (艾未未), whose personal cell phone was blocked and whose workshop’s internet connection was cut off
  • Beijing-based human rights activist Wu Gan (吴淦, known online as Butcher [屠夫]), though he was able to have service restored as of this afternoon
  • Shanghai author Xia Shang (夏商)
  • Scholar Mo Zhixu (莫之许), currently under soft detention in Leshan, Sichuan
  • Beijing author Wang Lixiong (王力雄) and Tibetan blogger Woeser (唯色), who also received a noticed from national security officers instructing them not to leave their home in the next few days
  • Hangzhou City author Wen Kejian (温克坚)
  • Wuxi City activist Hua Chunhui (华春辉)

Other reports of harassment from the past few days include:

  • National security officers barred Beijing lawyer Li Xiongbing (黎雄兵) from attending a legal seminar organized by the Delegation of the European Union to China
  • Six national security officers are following and monitoring Beijing activist and professor Xu Zhiyong (许志永)
  • Beijing activist Gu Chuan (古川) was accosted by three national security officers, who demanded that he not leave his home for the next two days. When Gu later went out to go grocery shopping, he was followed by two officers.
  • Hangzhou City democracy activist Wu Yilong (吴义龙) was placed under soft detention on December 9, while fellow democracy activists Mao Qingxiang (毛庆祥) and Zhu Yufu (朱虞夫) were placed under surveillance and asked to “have tea” by national security officers, respectively
  • Shanghai author and activist Jiang Danwen (蒋亶文) was placed under soft detention at home and prohibited from leaving his residence for any reason.
  • Chongqing activist Zhang Shijie (張世杰) was warned by national security officers monitoring him not to take part in any activities honoring Liu Xiaobo in the next few days
  • Beijing University professor Xia Yeliang (夏业良) has been “looked after” by police since December 6, and told not to take part in any celebratory activities, publish any writings online, or accept any interviews with foreign media
  • Guangzhou City, Guangdong Province activist Xiao Yong (肖勇) was taken away from his home by two police officers on the morning of December 9. The police said they were taking him to a guesthouse. Officers later returned to his residence and confiscated his notebook computer, cell phones belonging to him and his wife, and computer hard drives. Xiao returned home on December 11, but police refused to return his confiscated property, and likewise refused to provide Xiao with any legal documentation which might have authorized their actions.
  • The power has been cut off at the offices of Beijing NGO Aizhixing for the past three days, while both the electricity and water have been cut off at Beijing’s All Sages Bookstore (万圣书园), whose director, Liu Suli (刘苏里), is currently under soft detention.
  • Since December 4, Beijing activist Fan Yafeng’s (范亚峰) wife and mother-in-law have been under tight surveillance and followed whenever they leave their home; any packages arriving at their residence are thoroughly inspected. Fan himself has been under soft detention since November 1, and prohibited from leaving his home.
  • Zhang Xianling (张先玲), a member of the Tiananmen Mothers, has recently been put under 24-hour soft detention, and on December 8 will be forced to travel to Kunming with National Security officers.
  • Activist Zeng Jinyan (曾金燕), wife of imprisoned activist Hu Jia (胡佳), has been put under stricter surveillance in recent days. Hu Jia’s mother has been placed under soft detention on December 4, and cannot leave her home without a police “escort.”
  • On December 4, Beijing activist Chen Tianshi (陈天石) was forced to leave his job and he and his family were forced to leave their Beijing home and relocate to Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, where their household registration is located.
  • Since December 5, Beijing lawyer Li Xiongbing (黎雄兵) has been under soft detention and cannot leave his home.
  • Police asked Beijing netizen Liu Qiangben (刘强本) to leave his home on December 6 and live temporarily in a hotel.
  • Author Dai Qing (戴晴) has been under soft detention since returning to China in December.
  • Beijing activist Wang Lihong (王荔蕻) was been forced to leave her home in early December and is currently at a “resort area” on the outskirts of Beijing.
  • Since the morning of December 7, human rights lawyer Li Fangping (李方平) has been forced to travel in police vehicles while conducting business.
  • Human rights lawyer Tang Jitian (唐吉田) was kidnapped on December 7 by National Security officers and forced to leave Beijing to return to Jilin Province, where his household registration is located.
  • On December 8, Beijing scholar Gao Yu (高瑜) was stopped by police while trying to visit a friend and told he was not permitted to leave his home between December 8 and 11.

Chinese Police Ratchet up Pressure on Eve of Award Ceremony

As the Nobel Peace Prize award ceremony nears, police across the country are resorting to ever-stricter measures in order to ensure that prominent members of civil society are kept silent. In the last few days, beginning around December 4, National Security officers have been calling in activists and dissidents for “chats” and warning them not to leave their homes or take part in any activities to mark the Nobel Peace Prize award ceremony.

On December 9, police began rounding up activists and dissidents, forcing them to “travel” away from their homes for the next few days. The cases documented so far by CHRD include those of:

  • Beijing human rights activist and Charter 08 co-organizer Zhang Zuhua (张祖桦), who was abducted off the street near his home. His current whereabouts are unknown.
  • Beijing human rights lawyer and professor Teng Biao (滕彪), who was seized by police after teaching a class at China Political Science and Law and taken to Yanqing County, outside Beijing. He was told he would be held until December 12.
  • Beijing scholar Cui Weiping (崔卫平), who was taken to an undisclosed location on the outskirts of Beijing.
  • Beijing journalist Gao Yu (高瑜) and her husband, who were taken to to the airport by police. Their current whereabouts are unknown.
  • Beijing activist Wang Lihong (王荔蕻)
  • Beijing author Yu Jie (余杰)
  • Xi’an City human rights activist Yang Hai (杨海), who was taken to a location on the outskirts of the city and told he would be held until December 12. Yang protested that he needed to stay and care for his mother, who is ill, but police forcibly dragged him away.
  • Xi’an City human rights lawyer Zhang Jiankang (张鉴康), who was also caring for his ailing mother when police arrived to take him away.
  • Xi’an City activists Fu Sheng (傅升) and Ma Xiaoming (马晓明), who are believed to have been taken away as well, but about whom CHRD does not presently have more information

The following individuals were forced to leave their homes earlier this week:

  • Human rights lawyer Tang Jitian (唐吉田) was kidnapped on December 7 by National Security officers and forced to leave Beijing to return to Jilin Province, where his household registration is located.
  • Police asked Beijing netizen Liu Qiangben (刘强本) to leave his home on December 6 and live temporarily in a hotel.
  • On December 4, Beijing activist Chen Tianshi (陈天石) was forced to leave his job and he and his family were forced to leave their Beijing home and relocate to Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, where their household registration is located.
  • Zhang Xianling (张先玲), a member of the Tiananmen Mothers, has recently been put under 24-hour soft detention, and on December 8 was forced to travel to Kunming with National Security officers.

Others had their internet service cut off or their cell phone use limited (they may place outgoing calls, but cannot receive incoming calls), including:

  • Beijing scholar Xu Youyu (徐友渔)
  • Beijing activist Fan Yafeng (范亚峰), who was also taken away by police earlier today
  • Beijing artist and activist Ai Weiwei (艾未未), whose personal cell phone was blocked and whose workshop’s internet connection was severed
  • Beijing-based human rights activist Wu Gan (吴淦, known online as Butcher [屠夫]), though he was able to have service restored as of this afternoon
  • Shanghai author Xia Shang (夏商)
  • Scholar Mo Zhixu (莫之许), currently under soft detention in Leshan, Sichuan
  • Beijing author Wang Lixiong (王力雄) and Tibetan blogger Woeser (唯色), who also received a noticed from national security officers instructing them not to leave their home in the next few days, along with other prohibited acts
  • Hangzhou City author Wen Kejian (温克坚)
  • Wuxi City activist Hua Chunhui (华春辉)

Other reports of harassment from the past few days include:

  • National security officers barred Beijing lawyer Li Xiongbing (黎雄兵) from attending a legal seminar organized by the Delegation of the European Union to China
  • Six national security officers are following and monitoring Beijing activist and professor Xu Zhiyong (许志永)
  • Beijing activist Gu Chuan (古川) was accosted by three national security officers after going out to play with his child, who demanded that he not leave his home for the next two days. When Gu later went out to go grocery shopping, he was followed by two officers.
  • Hangzhou City democracy activist Wu Yilong (吴义龙) was placed under soft detention on December 9, while fellow democracy activists Mao Qingxiang (毛庆祥) and Zhu Yufu (朱虞夫) were placed under surveillance and asked to “have tea” by national security officers, respectively
  • Shanghai author and activist Jiang Danwen (蒋亶文) was placed under soft detention at home and prohibited from leaving his residence for any reason.
  • Chongqing activist Zhang Shijie (張世杰) was warned by national security officers monitoring him not to take part in any activities honoring Liu Xiaobo in the next few days
  • Beijing author Wang Lixiong (王力雄) and Tibetan blogger Woeser (唯色), who also received a noticed from national security officers instructing them not to leave their home in the next few days, along with other prohibited acts
  • Beijing University professor Xia Yeliang (夏业良), who has been “looked after” by police since December 6, and told not to take part in any celebratory activities, publish any writings online, or accept any interviews with foreign media
  • Guangzhou City, Guangdong Province activist Xiao Yong (肖勇) was taken away from his home by two police officers this morning, who said they were taking him to a guesthouse. Officers later returned to his residence and confiscated his notebook computer, cell phones belonging to him and his wife, and computer hard drives.
  • The power has been cut off at the offices of Beijing NGO Aizhixing for the past three days, while both the electricity and water have been cut off at Beijing’s All Sages Bookstore (万圣书园), whose director, Liu Suli (刘苏里), is currently under soft detention.
  • Since December 4, Beijing activist Fan Yafeng’s (范亚峰) wife and mother-in-law have been under tight surveillance and followed whenever they leave their home; any packages arriving at their residence are thoroughly inspected. Fan himself has been under soft detention since November 1, and prohibited from leaving his home.
  • Activist Zeng Jinyan (曾金燕), wife of imprisoned activist Hu Jia (胡佳), has been put under stricter surveillance in recent days. Hu Jia’s mother has been placed under soft detention on December 4, and cannot leave her home without a police “escort.”
  • Author Dai Qing (戴晴) has been under soft detention since returning to China in December.
  • Since the morning of December 7, human rights lawyer Li Fangping (李方平) has been forced to travel in police vehicles while conducting business.

No Contact With Liu Xiaobo’s Wife, Liu Xia, as Award Ceremony Nears

On the eve of the December 10 Nobel Peace Prize award ceremony, Liu Xiaobo’s wife, Liu Xia, remains illegally held incommunicado. She is believed to be confined to her home in Beijing, to which police have blocked all access. She cannot be contacted by phone, and her Twitter account went silent on October 18.

The Chinese Government Reacts

Updated: December 9

As of December 9, CHRD has compiled the following list of cases of Chinese activists, dissidents, or supporters of Liu Xiaobo who have suffered harassment, detention, or other restrictions on their activities as the Chinese government responds harshly to the Nobel Committee’s decision to award the 2010 Peace Prize to Liu Xiaobo. This same police pressure makes compiling a comprehensive list of such cases impossible, both because of restrictions on the flow of information and because many individuals subjected to police harassment are not willing to report this to the public; therefore, this list is designed to serve only to demonstrate the scope and types of police harassment currently taking place. One activist contacted by CHRD called the general situation “worse than during the buildup to the Olympics or after the release of Charter 08,” both instances in which the Chinese government launched similar crackdowns on civil society.

Criminal Detention (2):

  • Guo Xianliang (郭贤良), an engineer from Yunnan Province, was seized in Guangzhou City, Guangdong Province, where he was distributing flyers bearing information about Liu Xiaobo and the Nobel Peace Prize. He was detained on suspicion of “inciting subversion of state power,” the same crime for which Liu Xiaobo is imprisoned. On November 26, Guo was released on bail to await trial, and returned home to Yunnan.
  • Beijing citizen Shen Minqiang (沈民强) has reportedly been criminally detained after he was seized outside of Liu Xiaobo’s home by police for giving speeches and accepting interviews with foreign journalists

Administrative Detention (3):

  • Wang Lihong (王荔蕻), Wu Gan (吴淦, known online as Butcher [屠夫]), and Zhao Changqing (赵常青) were each given eight days of administrative detention for “disrupting public order” after they were seized by police at a celebratory gathering in Beijing on October 8. They have been released but are currently under strict surveillance.

Restrictions on movement (these individuals may have police stationed outside of their homes, or they may be under tight surveillance or monitoring, or they may have been barred from leaving their homes at certain times, etc. Some are subjected to tighter control than others: for example, Liu Xiaobo’s wife Liu Xia has effectively been cut off from the outside world.) (129):

  1. A Er (阿尔)
  2. Ai Xiaoming (艾晓明), Guangzhou human rights activist and Sun Yat-sen University professor, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements
  3. Bao Tong (鲍彤), former political secretary to CCP General Secretary Zhao Ziyang (赵紫阳), under soft detention at home in Beijing
  4. Cha Jianguo (查建国), Beijing democracy activist, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements
  5. Che Hongnian (车宏年), Jinan human rights activist, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements
  6. Chen Fengxiao (陈奉孝), Beijing author, under surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to leave the country
  7. Chen Guangbiao (陈光标)
  8. Chen Guangcheng (陈光诚), Shandong human rights defender, under soft detention at his home
  9. Chen Mingxian (陈明先), wife of detained Sichuan democracy activist Liu Xianbin (刘贤斌), under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to leave the country
  10. Chen Tianshi (陈天石)
  11. Chen Wei (陈卫), Sichuan human rights activist, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements , unable to leave the country
  12. Chen Xi (陈西), Guizhou human rights activist, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to travel
  13. Chen Yongmiao (陈永苗), Beijing internet writer, under surveillance and restriction on movements
  14. Chen Ziming (陈子明), Beijing scholar, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to leave the country
  15. Cheng Yizhong (程益中), Guangzhou journalist, under surveillance and restriction on movements
  16. Cui Weiping (崔卫平), Beijing Film Academy professor, prohibited from travelling to an international film festival on November 12 by school officials
  17. Ding Xikui (丁锡奎), Liu Xiaobo’s lawyer, under surveillance and restriction on movements in Beijing, unable to leave the country
  18. Ding Zilin (丁子霖), founder of the Tiananmen Mothers, held incommunicado under soft detention in Wuxi City, Jiangsu Province
  19. Du Guang (杜光), professor at the Central Party School, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements in Beijing
  20. Fan Yafeng (范亚峰), Beijing scholar and human rights activist, under soft detention, prohibited from leaving the country
  21. Feng Zhenghu (冯正虎), Shanghai human rights activist, under soft detention and unable to travel internationally
  22. Fu Guoyong (傅国涌), Hangzhou author, under surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to leave the country
  23. Gao Hongming (高洪明), Beijing democracy activist, under soft detention
  24. Gao Jian (高健)
  25. Gao Qiang (高强), Beijing artist, under surveillance and restriction on movements
  26. Gao Shen (高兟), Beijing artist, under surveillance and restriction on movements
  27. Gao Yu (高瑜), Beijing author and scholar, under surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to travel internationally
  28. Guo Yushan (郭玉闪), Beijing scholar, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, prohibited from travelling internationally
  29. He Yang (何杨)
  30. Hou Meixin (侯梅新), Guangzhou scholar, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, recently prevented from travelling internationally
  31. Hou Wenbao (侯文豹)
  32. Hu Shigen (胡石根), democracy activist, under soft detention in Beijing, does not have a passport
  33. Hua Ze (华泽)
  34. Jiang Danwen (蒋亶文), Shanghai author, under surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to travel internationally
  35. Jiang Peikun (蒋培坤)
  36. Jiang Peikun (蒋培坤), representative of Beijing massacre victims, held incommunicado under soft detention in Wuxi City, Jiangsu Province
  37. Jiang Qisheng (江棋生), Beijing author, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to travel internationally
  38. Jiang Tianyong (江天勇)
  39. Li Baiguang (李柏光), Beijing lawyer, under surveillance and restriction on movements
  40. Li Changyu (李昌玉), under tight surveillance and restriction on movements in Jinan City, Shandong Province
  41. Li Datong (李大同), China Youth Daily reporter, under surveillance and restriction on movements in Beijing
  42. Li Fangping (李方平), Beijing lawyer, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, with police stationed outside of his home; placed under soft detention on November 8 to prevent him from attending a legal seminar put on by the French government
  43. Li Hai (李海), democracy activist, taken away by police in Beijing on October 30 and has since been out of contact with the outside world
  44. Li Heping (李和平), Beijing lawyer, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements
  45. Li Rui (李锐), former deputy head of the CCP Organization Department and advocate for democratic reform, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements in Beijing
  46. Li Xianting (栗宪庭), Beijing artist, under surveillance and restriction on movements
  47. Li Xiongbing (黎雄兵), Beijing lawyer, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements
  48. Li Yuanlong (李元龙), Guizhou freelance writer, under surveillance and restriction on movements
  49. Li Zhiying (李智英)
  50. Liang Xiaoyan (梁晓燕), Beijing environmental activist, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to travel internationally
  51. Liao Yiwu (廖亦武), Sichuan author, under surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to travel internationally
  52. Ling Cangzhou (凌沧州), Beijing commentator, under surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to leave the country
  53. Liu Di (刘荻), freelance writer, under soft detention at home in Beijing, missing since December 6
  54. Liu Jingsheng (刘京生), Beijing democracy activist, under soft detention
  55. Liu Junning (刘军宁), constitutional scholar, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements in Beijing, barred from travelling internationally
  56. Liu Ning (刘柠)
  57. Liu Qiangben (刘强本)
  58. Liu Shahe (流沙河), Sichuan author, under surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to leave the country
  59. Liu Suli (刘苏里), Beijing scholar, kidnapped and injured on October 21 by Beijing National Security officers, now under soft detention at home
  60. Liu Xia (刘霞), Liu Xiaobo’s wife, is being held incommunicado under soft detention at her home in Beijing
  61. Lu Xuesong (卢雪松), Liaoning human rights activist and university professor, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to travel
  62. Ma Shaofang (马少方), Shenzhen businessman, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, prohibited from travelling internationally
  63. Mo Zhixu (莫之许), author, under soft detention in Leshan, Sichuan
  64. Ouyang Yi (欧阳懿), Sichuan author, under surveillance and restriction on movements
  65. Pu Zhiqiang (浦志强), Beijing lawyer, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to leave the country
  66. Qang Guangze (王光泽)
  67. Qi Zhiyong (齐志勇), activist wounded during Beijing massacre, under soft detention in Beijing
  68. Qin Geng (秦耕), Hainan author, under surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to leave the country
  69. Qin Yongmin (秦永敏), democracy activist, recently released from prison and living under post-release deprivation of political rights and tight surveillance and restriction on movements in Wuhan, Hubei
  70. Ran Yunfei (冉云飞), Sichuan author, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to travel
  71. Secretary Zhang (张书记)
  72. Sha Yexin (沙叶新), former head of the Shanghai Theater Academy, under surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to travel internationally
  73. Shang Baojun (尚宝军), Liu Xiaobo’s lawyer, under surveillance and restriction on movements in Beijing, unable to leave the country
  74. Sun Wenguang (孙文广), Shandong University professor, under soft detention at home in Jinan City, Shandong Province, application for a passport rejected by Jinan Public Security Bureau
  75. Teng Biao (滕彪), China University of Political Science and Law professor, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements and movements restricted in Beijing, passport confiscated
  76. Tiantian (天 天)
  77. Tie Liu (铁流), Beijing author, under surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to leave the country
  78. Wang Debang (王德邦), Guilin human rights activist, under surveillance and restriction on movements, prohibited from leaving the country
  79. Wang Jinbo (王金波)
  80. Wang Junxiu (王俊秀), Beijing scholar, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to leave the country
  81. Wang Kang (王康), Chongqing author, under surveillance and restriction on movements
  82. Wang Lihong (王荔蕻)
  83. Wang Rongqing (王荣清), Hangzhou democracy activist, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to leave the country
  84. Wang Shuling (王淑玲), wife of historian and dissident Bao Zunxin (包遵信), under surveillance and restriction on movements
  85. Wang Xiaoshan (王小山), Beijing journalist, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, barred from travelling internationally
  86. Wang Yi (王怡)
  87. Wang Zhongxia (王仲夏), Beijing human rights activist, under surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to leave the country
  88. Wen Kejian (温克坚), Hangzhou author, under surveillance and restriction on movements, prohibited from leaving the country
  89. Woeser (唯色), Tibetan author, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements in Beijing and refused a passport
  90. Wu Si (吴思), historian and journalist, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements in Beijing, barred from travelling internationally
  91. Xia Yeliang (夏业良), Beijing University economics professor, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, prohibited from leaving the country
  92. Xiao Xuehui (肖雪慧), Sichuan scholar, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to travel
  93. Xu Xiao (徐晓), Beijing scholar, under surveillance and restriction on movements
  94. Xu Yinong (许医农), Beijing publisher, under surveillance and restriction on movements
  95. Xu Youyu (徐友渔)
  96. Xu Zhiyong (许志永), Beijing human rights activist and university professor, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to travel internationally
  97. Yang Hai (杨海), Xi’an human rights activist, under surveillance and restriction on movements, denied a passport
  98. Yang Hengjun (杨恒均), Guangzhou author, under surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to leave the country
  99. Yang Licai (杨立才), Beijing artist and human rights activist, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements
  100. Yang Zili (杨子立), one of the four members of the “New Youth Society,” currently deprived of political rights and living in Beijing without a passport; under tight surveillance and restriction on movements
  101. Yao Lifa (姚立法)
  102. Ye Fu (野夫), Beijing author, under surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to travel internationally
  103. Ye Xiaogang (叶孝刚), Beijing author, under surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to leave the country
  104. Yin Yusheng (殷玉生), Beijing journalist, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to leave the country
  105. You Jingyou (游精佑), Fujian human rights activist, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements
  106. Yu Haocheng (于浩成), legal scholar, under soft detention at home in Beijing
  107. Yu Jie (余杰), Beijing author, under soft detention at home, unable to go outside
  108. Yu Meisun (俞梅荪)
  109. Yu Shicun (余世存), Beijing author, under surveillance and restriction on movements
  110. Zan Aizong (昝爱宗), Hangzhou author, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, prohibited from leaving the country
  111. Zeng Jinyan (曾金燕), Beijing human rights activist, under soft detention and unable to travel internationally
  112. Zhang Dajun (张大军), Beijing scholar, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, blocked from travelling to South Africa on October 10 by officials at Beijing’s Capitol Airport
  113. Zhang Honghai (张宏海), one of the four members of the “New Youth Society,” under tight surveillance and restriction on movements
  114. Zhang Hui (张辉), Beijing human rights activist, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, denied a passport
  115. Zhang Jiannan (张健男)
  116. Zhang Xianling (张先玲), member of the Tiananmen Mothers, under soft detention at home in Beijing
  117. Zhang Xianyang (张显扬), author, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements in Beijing, barred from travelling internationally
  118. Zhang Xingshui (张星水), Beijing lawyer, under surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to leave the country
  119. Zhang Xukun (张旭昆), Zhejiang University professor, under surveillance and restriction on movements
  120. Zhang Yihe (章诒和), Beijing author, under surveillance and restriction on movements
  121. Zhang Zuhua (张祖桦), constitutional scholar and principal drafter of Charter 08, under soft detention at home in Beijing
  122. Zhao Changqing (赵常青)
  123. Zhao Dagong (赵达功), Shenzhen author and activist, under surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to travel internationally
  124. Zhao Fengsheng (赵枫生)
  125. Zheng Xuguang (郑旭光), Beijing freelance writer and 1989 student leader, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements
  126. Zhou Duo (周舵). Beijing scholar and fellow hunger striker along with Liu Xiaobo during 1989 pro-democracy protests, under soft detention at home in Beijing and barred from travelling internationally
  127. Zhu Juru (朱菊如), Jiangxi human rights activist, sent to Re-Education through Labor
  128. Zhu Yufu (朱虞夫), Hangzhou democracy activist, under tight surveillance and restriction on movements, no passport
  129. Zhuang Daohe (庄道鹤), Hangzhou lawyer, under surveillance and restriction on movements, unable to leave the country

Of the above, the following were forcefully returned from Beijing to their hometowns before being placed under surveillance or having their movements restricted:

  • Zhao Changqing (赵常青), returned to Shaanxi
  • Wu Gan (吴淦), returned to Fujian
  • Hua Ze (华泽), returned to Jiangxi
  • Zhang Hui (张辉) and Gao Jian (高健), returned to Shanxi
  • Mo Zhixu (莫之许), returned to Sichuan
  • Hou Wenbao (候文豹), returned to Anhui
  • Chen Tianshi (陈天石), returned to Guangxi
  • Li Hai (李海), who was seized by police on October 30 and whose whereabouts remain unknown

Summoned for questioning (some of the following individuals were later subjected to further restrictions—see above list) (47):

  • Beijing: Wang Lihong (王荔蕻), Zhao Changqing (赵常青) Wu Gan (吴淦, known as “Butcher” [屠夫]), Xu Zhiyong (许志永), Liu Jingsheng (刘京生), Wang Guoqi (王国齐), He Yang (何杨), Zhang Yongpan (张永攀), Yin Yusheng (殷玉生), Zhao Fengsheng (赵枫生), Bao Longjun (包龙军), Liao Shuangyuan (廖双元), Wu Yuqin (吴玉琴), Gao Jian (高健), Wei Qiang (魏强), A Er (阿尔), Xiao Lu (小路), Tiantian (天天) and two others
  • Shandong Province: Sun Wenguang (孙文广), Li Hongwei (李红卫), Ni Wenhua (倪文华), Qin Zhigang (秦志刚), Liu Guiqin (刘桂芹), Jie Jinyu (解金玉), Hou Zonglan (侯宗兰), Gao Xiangming (高祥明), Li Wanlong (李万龙), Gong Lei (巩磊), Chen Qingquan (陈清泉), Li Changyu (李昌玉), Li Shijun (李世骏)
  • Guizhou Province: Chen Xi (陈西), Huang Yanming (黄燕明), Du Heping (杜和平), Shen Youlian (申有连), Xu Guoqing (徐国庆), Li Renke (李任科)
  • Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region: Duan Qixian (端启宪), Zhang Wei (张炜) and two others
  • Zhejiang Province: Zan Aizong (昝爱宗)
  • Hebei Province: Zhu Xinxin (朱欣欣)
  • Guangdong Province: Ye Du (野渡), whose home was also searched by police.
  • Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region: Chen Xiaochang (陈 晓昶)

 

Warned against participating in celebrations related to the Nobel Committee’s decision, writing or spreading information about Liu Xiaobo and the Nobel Peace Prize, or otherwise harassed by police (in addition to all those listed above) :

 

  • Xi’an City, Shaanxi Province: Yang Hai (杨海) and Zhang Jiankang (张鉴康)
  • Guangxi Province: Wang Debang (王德邦)
  • Zhejiang Province: Wen Kejian (温克坚)
  • Hunan Province: Li Jianjun (黎建军) and Zhang Shanguang (张善光)
  • Guizhou Province: Mei Chongpiao (糜崇骠), Mo Jiangang (莫建刚), Tian Zuxiang (田祖湘), and Yong Zhiming (雍志明)
  • Fujian Province: You Jingyou (游精佑)

Prevented from Leaving the Country:

CHRD has learned of multiple cases in which Chinese activists, lawyers, and scholars have been stopped at airports or border crossings while trying to travel to Hong Kong or international destinations. In most cases, border control officials have told the individuals that they are under orders from higher authorities to stop them from leaving, as they may “pose a threat to state security” if allowed abroad. We believe that these individuals are being prevented from leaving the country because the Chinese government fears they will attempt to attend the Nobel Peace Prize award ceremony on December 10 in Oslo, Norway.

As of December 2, CHRD has received reports indicating that the following individuals have been prevented from travelling internationally:

  • Mao Yushi (茅于轼),
  • Ai Weiwei (艾未未),
  • Liu Xiaoyuan (刘晓原),
  • Cui Weiping (崔卫平),
  • Mo Shaoping (崔卫平),
  • He Weifang (贺卫方),
  • Li Subin (李苏斌),
  • Jiang Tianyong (江天勇),
  • He Guanghu (何光沪),
  • Liao Yiwu (廖亦武),
  • Hao Jian (郝建),
  • Zhang Boshu (张博树),
  • Wu Si’s (吴思) daughter
  • Guo Yushan (郭玉闪),
  • Fang Cao (吴思)
  • Wang Jinglong (王京龙),
  • Duan Qixian (端启宪),
  • Yu Fangqiang (于方强),
  • Lu Yuegang’s (卢跃刚) wife,
  • Ding Ding (丁丁), son of Ding Dong (丁东) and Geng Xiaoqun (邢小群)
  • Jia Jia’s (贾葭) wife,
  • Hu Jia’s (胡佳) younger sister,
  • Teng Biao’s (滕彪) wife,
  • and close to 200 Chinese Christians who had planned to attend an evangelical conference in South Africa.

Update on Prison Conditions Faced by Nobel Laureate Liu Xiaobo

CHRD has obtained updated information regarding the conditions under which 2010 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Liu Xiaobo (刘晓波) is currently incarcerated in Liaoning Province’s Jinzhou Prison. Liu shares a cell with five prisoners, all of whom are serving long sentences. These others are allowed weekly family visits and allowed to pay the prison to order specially prepared, better food. Liu is allowed only monthly family visits and not allowed to pay for better food. He is only allowed to buy snacks from the prison shop. The food in the prison generally has little nutritional value and is of bad quality. Liu has developed stomach problems while in prison, and he continues to suffer from hepatitis. He and the other inmates get two hours each day to go outdoors. He can only receive books (brought by his wife) that are published and sold in bookstores in China. While there is a TV in the cell, the prison controls which programs the inmates are allowed to watch.

Chinese Citizens React

One Chinese activist recounts his experience on October 8: “I heard the news from the Internet as many of my fellow activists did… we used proxy sites to get past the government firewall to access news websites outside China. Many activists got the news from Twitter. I and many others could not believe what we heard. Many broke down in tears, some reported uncontrollable sobbing. Some said they had to pinch themselves to make sure they were not dreaming. There were reported (on Twitter) fireworks on the campuses of Beijing University and People’s University immediately after the announcement at 4pm Beijing time. Many people gathered in restaurants or at friends’ houses to toast and party all over the country. Some activists distributed flyers in the streets. Some took walking tours in cities, riding buses or subway, while telling anybody they ran into the good news. Many sent messages to their friends and families and colleagues and alumni. They did this with a sense of mission to break down official censorship and tell the ordinary people who Liu Xiaobo is and what he did.”

Spreading the News

As mentioned earlier, Twitter was an important source of information for Chinese citizens in this case, despite the fact that it is blocked on the mainland. A selection of tweets related to Liu Xiaobo can be found by searching the hashtag #liuxiaobo.

Stories of Chinese citizens spreading the news in other ways are being collected below:

On October 10, 72 year-old activist Mei Chongbiao (糜崇骠) took up his usual position on People’s Square in Guiyang City, Guizhou Province, where he has appeared on the weekends for years to distribute articles from international media and Chinese dissidents about democracy, human rights, and world affairs. On this particular day, he presented articles about Liu Xiaobo winning the Nobel Peace Prize, which fellow activists estimated drew a crowd of “more than one hundred” citizens excited to learn of the news. Mei, the son of a decorated general who was executed by the government in the 1950s, has persevered in his efforts to educate local citizens and promote human rights and democracy in China despite repeated harassment and threats from local police. (CHRD)[1]

Yunnan engineer Guo Xianliang passed out flyers containing information about Liu Xiaobo and the Nobel Peace Prize on the street and in public parks while visiting Guangzhou; as a result, he was criminally detained by police. See below (“The Chinese Government Reacts”) for more details.

Statements from Prominent Chinese Activists and Groups

The following statements by Chinese individuals or groups have been posted online in the days following October 8. This is not designed to be a comprehensive list by any means, but a sampling of the sentiments being expressed on the internet:

廖亦武:关于刘晓波获诺贝尔的笑话两则: http://news.boxun.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010150212.shtml

争取中国民主人权征程上的里程碑——“维权网”就刘晓波先生荣获诺贝尔和平奖的声明: http://www.chinesepen.org/Article/yzzjwyh/201010/Article_20101009120107.shtml

《零八宪章》论坛声明:热烈庆祝刘晓波荣获诺贝尔和平奖: http://news.boxun.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010090944.shtml

赵达功:我们心中有一面“刘晓波的旗帜”: http://news.boxun.com/news/gb/pubvp/2010/10/201010091643.shtml

開放雜誌聲明﹕劉曉波榮獲諾貝爾和平獎: http://news.boxun.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010102058.shtml

赵枫生:“十月八”记事:

http://news.boxun.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010110825.shtml

王有才:写在刘晓波先生获得诺贝尔奖之后: http://news.boxun.com/news/gb/pubvp/2010/10/201010110334.shtml

王森称刘晓波获奖是世界华人的骄傲: http://news.boxun.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010122315.shtml

黄燕明:一个不平静的历史性夜晚——贺刘晓波获得诺贝尔和平奖:

http://news.boxun.com/news/gb/pubvp/2010/10/201010102053.shtml

欢呼刘晓波先生荣获诺贝尔和平奖/査建国 高洪明: http://news.boxun.com/news/gb/pubvp/2010/10/201010092253.shtml

 

Continued Censorship of the News

As expected, Chinese officials have pulled out all the stops to prevent citizens from learning that the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Liu Xiaobo.

Even before the prize was announced, officials ordered managers at China’s four main domestic internet portals—Ten Cent, Sina, Sohu, and Net Ease –to remove pages dedicated to the 2010 Nobel Prizes. Online discussion of the Nobel Peace Prize or Liu Xiaobo continues to be actively blocked.[20]

CHRD has also learned that, in addition to internet censorship of the news, cell phone text messages related to Liu Xiaobo or the Nobel Peace Prize are being blocked by cellular carriers.

Hackers are targeting websites outside of the reach of the Great Firewall. On the afternoon of October 11, a large number of websites–including those operated by the Independent Chinese PEN, New Century News, Boxun, Charter 08, Canyu, and others–were struck by malicious attacks. These sites, which are hosted abroad, are used by Chinese netizens to post independent news and had been reporting on Liu Xiaobo’s Nobel Peace Prize and government efforts to clamp down on activists and others who sought to draw attention to the award domestically. Most had their homepages infected with viruses, according to a source familiar with the events. It is believed that these attacks are organized and highly sophisticated. CHRD’s website has been out of service for a number of months after suffering similar attacks earlier this summer. (CHRD)[21]


[1] “Son of General in War against Japan Mei Chongpiao Spreads News of Nobel Prize; Independent Poet Wang Cang Lends Support” (抗日将领遗子糜崇骠为国人获诺奖宣传 自由诗人王藏为其声援助威(图)), October 12, 2010, http://www.peacehall.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010121247.shtml

[2] “A Number of Scholars in Beijing Obstructed, Kidnapped, and Harassed on the Same Day” (北京几名学者同日受到阻止、绑架与骚扰), October 22, 2010, http://news.boxun.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010221129.shtml

[3] “A Number of Scholars in Beijing Obstructed, Kidnapped, and Harassed on the Same Day” (北京几名学者同日受到阻止、绑架与骚扰), October 22, 2010, http://news.boxun.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010221129.shtml

[4] “Guizhou Human Rights Forum Statement: Trampling on the Constitution Has no Happy Ending” (贵州人权研讨会声明:践踏宪法,没有好下场), October 22, 2010, http://news.boxun.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010222047.shtml

[5]Charter 08 Signatory Leaves Flowers at Norway Pavilion in Shanghai Expo, Is Called for ‘Tea’” (《零八宪章》签署者向世博挪威馆献花被请“喝茶”), October 16, 2010, http://www.peacehall.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010160843.shtml

[6] “Jinan Police Summon Many for Celebrating Liu Xiaobo’s Nobel Prize” (济南警方大肆传唤庆祝刘晓波获奖人士), October 16, 2010, http://www.peacehall.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010161332.shtml; “Shandong Activist Ni Wenhua and June 4th Victim Xie Jinyu Summoned” (山东维权人士倪文华与“六四”受难者谢金玉被传唤), October 17, 2010 http://www.peacehall.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010171424.shtml

[7] “Xie Fulin Barred From Watching Television, Reading Newspaper after Hearing of Liu Xiaobo’s Nobel Prize” (谢福林因收听刘晓波获奖而被禁看电视报纸), October 16, 2010, http://www.peacehall.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010161826.shtml

[8] “Netizens Tiantian, Liu Qiangben Taken Away by Police outside of Wang Lihong’s Home” (网友天天、刘强本在王荔蕻家门口被警察带走), October 18, 2010, http://news.boxun.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010180034.shtml

[9] “Many Guangxi Netizens Summoned for Celebrating Liu Xiaobo’s Nobel Peace Prize Win” (广西多名网友庆祝刘晓波获诺奖遭传唤), October 18, 2010, http://news.boxun.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010181235.shtml; “Guangxi Activist Zhang Wei Summoned for Celebrating Liu Xiaobo’s Nobel Prize” (广西维权人士张维庆贺刘晓波获奖遭传唤), October 18, 2010, http://news.boxun.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010181943.shtml

[10] “Butcher Sent Back to Fujian, Zhang Hui Placed under Guard” (屠夫被遣送回福建,张辉被警察值班版), October 16, 2010, http://www.peacehall.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010162258.shtml

[11] “Democracy Activist Zhao Changqing Forcibly Returned to Hometown of Shanyang County, Shaanxi Province (民主维权人士赵常青被遣送回陕西山阳老家), October 18, 2010, http://news.boxun.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010182320.shtml

[12] “Human Rights Activist Liu Shasha Kidnapped by Henan National Security Officers, Returned to Nanyang” (维权人士刘沙沙被河南国保绑架回南阳), October 16, 2010, http://www.peacehall.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010162202.shtml

[13] “Local Authorities in China Step up Internet Controls, Clamp Down on Activists and Scholars” (中 国当局连日进一步加紧网络封锁、控制维权人士与学者), October 12, 2010, http://www.peacehall.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010122213.shtml

[14] “Dinner for Friends Organized by Zhou Tuo Thwarted by Police” (周舵召集朋友聚餐活动遭警方破坏), October 9, 2010, http://www.peacehall.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010092331.shtml

[15] “Guizhou Human RIghts Forum Members in Beijing to Congratulate Liu Xiaobo Missing for More than 100 Hours” (贵州人权研讨会成员在京贺刘晓波获奖失踪1百多个小时), October 12, 2010, http://www.peacehall.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010121131.shtml

[16] “Activists Across the Country Threatened or Deprived of their Freedom after Liu Xiaobo is Awarded Nobel Peace Prize” (各地维权人士因刘晓波获奖被限制自由或严厉警告(图)), October 9, 2010, http://news.boxun.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010090136.shtml

[17] “Activists Across the Country Continue to be Summoned, Placed under Soft Detention because Liu Xiaobo Won the Nobel Peace Prize” (因刘晓波获得诺奖各地继续传唤、软禁维权人士), October 11, 2010, http://www.peacehall.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010111521.shtml

[18] “Liu Xiaobo Wins Nobel Prize, Chen Yunfei Barred from Leaving Home” (刘晓波获诺奖 陈云飞出门受阻), October 12, 2010, http://www.peacehall.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010121108.shtml

[19] “Sichuan Province Democracy ACtivist Wang Sen Summoned by Dazhou National Security” (四川民主党人王 森被达州国保传唤), October 12, 2010, http://www.peacehall.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010121221.shtml

[20] “Nobel Peace Prize About to be Announced; CCP Authorities Order Four Main Internet Portals to Delete Special Topics” (诺贝尔和平奖即将公布 中共当局命令四大门户删除专题(图)), October 8, 2010, http://news.boxun.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010081612.shtml

[21] “After Liu Xiaobo Wins Nobel Peace Prize, Independent Chinese PEN and Other Websites Attacked” (刘 晓波获奖后,独立中文笔会等多家网站被攻击), October 12, 2010, http://www.peacehall.com/news/gb/china/2010/10/201010121007.shtml